Future of Food

A Moveable Feast

Fresh produce can travel a long way to reach the supermarket.
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This isn't a still life from 17th-century Europe. It's fresh produce from four upscale markets in Manhattan.

Eating locally and reducing carbon footprints may be in, but these fruits and vegetables made big trips to the Big Apple—in some cases covering nearly 9,000 miles. In fact, in the United States, produce imports have increased significantly since 1980.

Amit Ratanshi, a seller at a Bronx distributor, says New York chefs and shoppers "want to know where their food is coming from." That can mean a farm down the road, across the country, or—if it's exotic goods—half a world away.

Eating locally and reducing carbon footprints may be in, but these fruits and vegetables made big trips to the Big Apple—in some cases covering nearly 9,000 miles. In fact, in the United States, produce imports have increased significantly since 1980.

PRODUCE MILEAGE

- 223,875: The total distance traveled by all the food items combined is 223,875 miles. That's enough to travel around the Earth roughly nine times.

- 3,731 miles: The average distance traveled for all of the items is 3,731 miles.

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Find this month's story from the National Geographic Future of Food series at natgeofood.com.

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