Photo: Hawai'i Crickets Evolved "Silent" Wings to Evade Parasites, Study Finds



A male field cricket infested with the larvae of a parasitic fly. Male crickets on the Hawaiian island of Kaua'i rapidly evolved "silent" wings due to pressure from the fly, which finds its prey by sound, new research reveals.

But even though the muted males can't sing to attract and court females, the insects' population is thriving—a fact scientists attribute to female crickets becoming less picky when choosing a mate.

Photograph courtesy J. Rotenberry, UCR


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