Mount Sinabung Volcano Erupts in Indonesia, Displaces 20,000

Hot ash and poisonous gas disrupts life for thousands of local villagers.

Mount Sinabung spews hot lava as seen from Jeraya, North Sumatra, Indonesia.


Mount Sinabung—a volcano in Indonesia—has erupted 220 times in the past week and displaced more than 20,000 local villagers.

The 8,530-foot-high (2,600-meter-high) volcano has been erupting since September 2013. Even though the volcano has been active for several months, local authorities have confirmed that the eruptions are intensifying.

On Sunday, Mount Sinabung released a plume of hot ash measuring 4,000 meters high.


The Indonesian government has evacuated residents living near the volcano, displacing more than 20,000 villagers living within the danger zone, currently defined as a radius of 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) around the volcano's peak.

It has recently been extended to 7 kilometers (4 miles) southeast of the volcano where, according to the Wall Street Journal, volcanic activity is reported to be much higher.

Mount Sinabung sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire, a fault line in the Pacific Ocean that frequently experiences volcanic activity. Sinabung is one of 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia. It became active in 2010 after hundreds of years of dormancy.

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