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The Monkey and the Snake: How the Primate Brain Reacts to Serpents

A new study probes a hardwired fear of snakes.

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Humans may be hardwired to fear snakes.


Image of the 125 Anniversary logo Snakes on a Plane, snakes in a can, a rubber snake under someone's chair—just thinking we see a snake is enough to make some of us leap away like a suddenly expert dancer. And it might be those slithery serpents that helped us evolve to see as well as we do.

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