National Geographic Daily News

National Geographic News

Published March 15, 2011

Zoom in and out of satellite pictures of Japan before and after a magnitude 9.0 earthquake spawned a deadly tsunami on March 11. (Also see: 20 "unforgettable" pictures of the tsunami.)

Mouse over the images to access zoom tools. "Home" icon returns picture to fully zoomed-out view.

RELATED

More Tsunami News and Pictures

How You Can Help Japan Tsunami Victims

0 comments

Share

Minamisanriku, Japan, in 2002 and After 2011 Tsunami

A 30-foot (9-meter) tsunami wave following the March 11 earthquake destroyed the village of Minamisanriku, where up to 10,000 people—60 percent of its population—are now missing, according to the Telegraph.

Satellite pictures courtesy Google, GeoEye (2002) and Google, Digital Globe (2011)

Soccer Field in Minamisanriku, Japan, in 2002 and After 2011 Tsunami

Survivors of the Minamisanriku tsunami reported seeing the whole town being pushed into a valley by rising waters, according to the Telegraph.

Satellite pictures courtesy Google, GeoEye (2002) and Google, Digital Globe (2011)

Yagawahama, Japan, in 2007 and After the 2011 Tsunami

Damage to roads and infrastructure have prevented rescue workers from accessing much of the hard-hit coastal prefecture of Migayi, where the town of Yagawahama is located, according to Voice of America.

Satellite pictures courtesy Google, Digital Globe (2007) and Google, Geo Eye (2011)

Sendai Airport, Japan, in 2003 and After the 2011 Tsunami

In a scene of "utter carnage" on March 11, houses-turned-flotsam smashed into buildings of the once bustling Sendai Airport, reducing it to rubble, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

Satellite pictures courtesy Google, Digital Globe (2003) and Google, Geo Eye (2011)

Yuriage, Japan, in 2008 and After the 2011 Tsunami

Once a "pleasant fishing port," this town of 7,000 has been wiped off the map by the giant wave, according to BBC News.

Satellite pictures courtesy Google, Digital Globe (2008) and Google, Geo Eye (2011)

How to Feed Our Growing Planet

  • Feed the World

    Feed the World

    National Geographic explores how we can feed the growing population without overwhelming the planet in our food series.

See blogs, stories, photos, and news »

The Innovators Project

  • Teen Wonder: Taylor Wilson

    Teen Wonder: Taylor Wilson

    After achieving nuclear fusion at age 14, Taylor, now 19, is working with subatomic particles for solutions to nuclear terrorism and cancer.

See more innovators »

Phenomena

See more posts »

Latest News Video

  • How a T. Rex Packs for a Road Trip

    How a T. Rex Packs for a Road Trip

    The nation's most complete Tyrannosaurus rex specimen is taking a 2,000-mile road trip from Montana to its new home in Washington, D.C.

See more videos »

See Us on Google Glass

Shop Our Space Collection

  • Be the First to Own <i>Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey</i>

    Be the First to Own Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

    The updated companion book to Carl Sagan's Cosmos, featuring a new forward by Neil deGrasse Tyson is now available. Proceeds support our mission programs, which protect species, habitats, and cultures.

Shop Now »