STRANGE CROC PICTURES: New Dino-Eater, Galloper, More

STRANGE CROC PICTURES: New Dino-Eater, Galloper, More
<< Previous   5 of 6   Next >>
DuckCroc (seen as a model) had a long, smooth, sensitive nose to poke through vegetation, as well as hook-shaped teeth to snag frogs and small fish in shallow water, paleontologists announced in November 2009.

"Gondwana had lots of real oddballs," said Hans Dieter-Sues, a paleontologist at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the research.

"For somebody who has studied a lot of fossil crocodilyforms, I'm fascinated by these creatures," Sues added.
—Photograph courtesy NGT
 
NEWS FEEDS    After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed. After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS




 

50 Drives of a Lifetime

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.