ANIMAL "ZOMBIES": Nature's "Walking Dead" in Pictures

ANIMAL ''ZOMBIES'': Nature's ''Walking Dead'' in Pictures
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Just lay low for a while--if it's good enough for stool pigeons, why not for frogs?

When the pressure's on--during a drought, for instance--the burrowing frog literally goes underground. There, it switches into extreme-efficiency mode, slowing its metabolism to such an extent that it can survive up to several years without food or water.

According to a 2009 study by researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia, the frogs are the champions of dormancy among vertebrates, largely because the "power plants" of their cells--mitochondria--operate much more efficiently during "suspended animation" periods. This allows the frog to derive maximum bang from minimal energy stores.
—Photograph courtesy Sara M. Kayes
 
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