"LOST SYMBOL" PHOTOS: Real Places From Dan Brown's Book

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U.S. Botanic Garden

Hints in the days leading up to the September 15, 2009, publication of The Lost Symbol suggest main character Robert Langdon will visit the giant, fan-shaped traveler's palm housed in the U.S. Botanic Garden on the grounds of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C..

The palm "gets its name from thirsty travelers finding water stored in its leaf folds ... which may each hold up to one quart [one liter] of water," said Botanic Garden spokesperson Sally Bourrie.

How might the traveler's palm tie in to Langdon's mission? Legend has it, Bourrie said, that if a traveler stands directly in front of the palm and makes a wish in "good spirit," that wish will come true.

More on the History and Symbols Behind Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol
"The Lost Symbol" and the Freemasons: 8 Myths Decoded
"LOST SYMBOL" PHOTOS: Real Places From Dan Brown's New Book
"LOST SYMBOL" PICTURES: Masonic Symbols Decoded
—Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic Stock
 
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