FUTURE FISH FARMS: Giant Deep-Sea Pods, in Pictures

FUTURE FISH FARMS: Giant Deep-Sea Pods, in Pictures
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An Aquapod fish-farming cage floats at the Snapperfarm fish farm Puerto Rico in an undated photo-illustration composite image. Aquapods are composed of triangular panels covered with vinyl-coated, galvanized steel netting and come in sizes from 8 to 28 meters in diameter (26 to 92 feet in diameter).

MIT scientist Cliff Goudey has outfitted Aquapods with remote control propeller systems (not pictured), foreshadowing a potential future where fish cages roam clean, deep-sea waters of their own accord.

Aquaculture currently produces about half of the fish eaten worldwide, but--with wild stocks waning and demand for fish increasing--seems destined to play an even bigger future role.

The UN's Food and Agriculture Organization warns that 70 percent of all the worlds' fisheries are exploited (barely able to replenish themselves at current catch rates), overexploited, or depleted.
— Image courtesy Ocean Farm Technologies
 
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