SPACE PHOTOS THIS WEEK: Space Eye, Jupiter Blast, More

SPACE PHOTOS THIS WEEK: Space Eye, Jupiter Blast, More
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July 24, 2009--Five days after an object crashed into Jupiter, raising a dark plume about the size of Earth's Pacific Ocean, NASA used the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope to image the impact site.

The plume raised by the object, thought to have been an asteroid or comet, strongly resembles the dust cloud raised in 1994, when chunks of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 walloped Jupiter.

Making this image extra special, NASA chose to create it with the uncalibrated Wide Field Camera 3. The new camera was installed on Hubble during a series of difficult spacewalks in May, extending the space telescope's working life by at least five years. This photograph is the new camera's first scientific research.

(See an image comparing the impact explosion with the size of Earth.)
—Image courtesy NASA, ESA, and H. Hammel (Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado) and the Jupiter Comet Impact Team
 
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