APOLLO 11: New Before-and-After Photos of Moon Bases

APOLLO 11: New Before-and-After Photos of Moon Bases
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This restored 1967 image released on July 17, 2009 from the Lunar Orbiter 5 analog moon-imaging spacecraft shows a patch of moon that would become the first manned moon landing site two years later.

Taken in orbit by a robot, the picture was one of many made to map the moon to help NASA choose landing sites.

When a computer error steered the Apollo 11 lunar module toward a crater, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin overrode the autopilot and landed about six kilometers (four miles) beyond the intended landing site (actual landing site pictured).

Despite extensive restoration efforts, this photo is fuzzier and grainier than many of the restored 1960s orbiter images because of repeated viewings of the magnetic tape on which the photo was recorded. (See other restored high-res images from the project.)

The craters' apparent "pop" when clicking between this image and the one on the previous page results from the differing angles of sunlight and shadows. A white cross at the left and a dotted line at the right are markings made by image technicians to help align portions of the picture.
— Image courtesy NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University; image alignment by National Geographic News staff
 
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