FATHER'S DAY PICTURES: ''Best'' Animal Dads

FATHER'S DAY PICTURES: Best Animal Dads
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Talk about back-breaking work—the male giant water bug (pictured above in California) literally totes around his brood of about 150 eggs until they hatch.

After a courtship of sparring and grasping, these ferocious insects mate, and the females cement their fertilized eggs to the males' backs with a natural glue.

Over the next three weeks, the male becomes a "very effective dad," said Scott Forbes, a University of Winnipeg biologist and author of A Natural History of Families. The daddy water bug fiercely protects his eggs and periodically exposes them to air to prevent them from growing mold.

—Photograph by Gerald and Buff Corsi, Visuals Unlimited
 
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