MANHATTAN 1609 vs. 2009: Natural Wonder to Urban Jungle

MANHATTAN 1609 vs. 2009: Natural Wonder to Urban Jungle
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In 1609 a large Lenape Indian settlement called the eastern foot of Inwood Hill home (see campfires in illustration at right), as does the Inwood neighborhood today. The site offered the Indians convenient access to the Harlem River (left) and the Hudson River, homes to rich fisheries.

Inwood Hill Park contains the last natural forest and salt marsh in Manhattan.

"Legend has it that there was a tree in the park where Peter Minuit [a colonial administrator for the Dutch East India Company] bought the island from the Indians [in 1626]," said Eric Sanderson, head of the Mannahatta Project, which began April 20, 2009. "It's supposed to have been blown down in 1926."
—Image courtesy Markley Boyer, Mannahatta Project/Wildlife Conservation Society
 
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