PHOTOS: Amazon Rain Forest's Untapped Fruit Bounty

PHOTOS: Amazon's Next ''Cinderella'' Fruit?
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October 14, 2008--A young boy in Peru's Pacaya Samiria National Reserve gathers yumanasa berries in the wild. They're a sweet, juicy treat with one-and-a-half times the vitamin C of oranges.

Fruits form the centerpiece of the local diet in Pacaya Samiria, a protected Amazon wetland. More than 100 wild and domesticated fruits grow here every year. Residents depend on them for nutrients like vitamins, protein, and oils the rest of us get from a variety of other foods, including vegetables and nuts.

Although the Amazon occasionally yields commercially valuable fruits, international markets have yet to plumb most of its bounty. (Read the full story.)
—Photograph by Nigel Smith
 
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