Deadly Frog Fungus Spreads in Virus-Like Waves

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2

Questionable Results

Not everyone agrees with the new results. Biologists Camille Parmesan and Michael Singer of the University of Texas, Austin, called the team's analysis "questionable" in a response to the paper posted online on the PloS Biology Web site.

Parmesan claims that the team wrongly equated the date of the first observed amphibian decline in a region with the onset of chytrid infection.

"They're using the date of decline as a proxy, but they actually don't know when the fungus arrived," Parmesan told National Geographic News.

"The decline could be occurring because of anything—including climate change."

Parmesan and others suggest a third possibility: Global warming and the spread of natural disease are working together to reduce frog populations.

"The data's pretty crappy to be honest, but it's good enough to say that both the fungus and climate change are separately responsible for some population declines and some species extinctions," she said.

"More than that, you can't say."

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2


SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

ADVERTISEMENT

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S PHOTO OF THE DAY

NEWS FEEDS     After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.   After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

National Geographic Daily News To-Go

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.
Click here to get 12 months of National Geographic Magazine for $15.