India Tribe Law Damaging to Tigers?

India Tribe Law Damaging to Tigers?
<< Previous   2 of 6   Next >>
A forest tribal man carries saal leaves collected from inside Badrama Wildlife Sanctuary in Orissa, India, on October 25, 2007.

Before the sanctuary was created, more than 1,500 local families derived primary income from selling saal seeds and leaves. The leaves are stitched into plates that are used to feed guests at ceremonies and celebrations throughout Orissa.

In the nearby market in Sambalpur, a hundred saal plates sell for approximately 40 U.S. cents.

When Badrama was established as a wildlife sanctuary, many forest families faced a devastating cut in earnings as guards began to bar their access to the jungle.

"It's been almost as if the local people don't really matter when setting up a protected area," said Ashish Kothari, co-founder of Kalpavriksh, a leading environmental research and advocacy group in Pune.

More Photos in the News
Today's 15 Most Read Stories
Free Email Newsletter: Focus on Photography
—Photograph by Paroma Basu
 
NEWS FEEDS    After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed. After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS




 

50 Drives of a Lifetime

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.