New Tiger Population Found Outside Indian Reserve

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2

But Pariwakam and others question Sawarkar's claim that 20 tigers may be living in Sahyadri.

"The absurd pug-mark [paw print] census method that was used in the past to come up with specific tiger numbers like this now stands discredited," said K. Ullas Karanth, a tiger expert and director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's India branch.

(Related news: "Faulty Counts May Have Hurt India Tigers, Experts Say" [August 7, 2003].)

"I don't see any data in support of this number," Karanth added.

Yet Sawarkar is confident that an ongoing state-of-the-art tiger census, conducted by WII, will officially confirm his estimate.

The WII census—the results of which should be released by late 2007—is unprecedented in its use of new tiger-tallying techniques.

For example, scientists are using strategically placed cameras fitted with motion sensors to count passing tigers.

Preliminary estimates based on the census suggest that India's wild tiger population numbers between 1,300 and 1,500, less than half of what it was in 2002.

Free Email News Updates
Sign up for our Inside National Geographic newsletter. Every two weeks we'll send you our top stories and pictures (see sample).

<< Back to Page 1   Page 2 of 2


SOURCES AND RELATED WEB SITES

ADVERTISEMENT

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S PHOTO OF THE DAY

NEWS FEEDS     After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.   After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

National Geographic Daily News To-Go

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.
Click here to get 12 months of National Geographic Magazine for $15.