Week in Photos: Space Geysers, ''Fossil Fish,'' More

Week in Photos: Space Geysers, ''Fossil Fish,'' More
<< Previous   4 of 7   Next >>
Zanzibar, Tanzania, July 14, 2007—For a lucky crew of Africans, it's one whopper of a fish tale.

Trawling near the Zanzibar islands off the east coast of Africa, the crew recently hauled up a coelacanth—a "living fossil" fish once thought to have died off with the dinosaurs.

Here, an unidentified researcher measures the find, which was 4.4 feet (1.35 meters) long and weighed 60 pounds (27 kilograms).

The elusive fish, which disappeared from fossil records about 65 million years ago, was rediscovered in 1938 near South Africa. Since then, dozens more of the deep-sea dwellers—notable for their alternating lobed fins, thick scales, hinged jaws, and unusual skull structure—have been captured. Those unique characteristics make the coelacanth an important evolutionary step in the transition from fish to four-limbed land animals, experts say.

More Photos in the News
Today's Top 15 Most Popular Stories
Free Email Newsletter: "Focus on Photography"

—Photograph by Dr Narriman Jiddawi/Institute of Marine Sciences in Zanzibar/Handout/Reuters
 
NEWS FEEDS    After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed. After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS




 

50 Drives of a Lifetime

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.