Video in the News: Africa "Megaflyover"

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Conservationist J. Michael Fay shot this video during his "Megaflyover" expedition to document how humanity has affected Africa's ecosystems. Read below the video player for details.

August 17, 2005—J. Michael Fay is a conservationist with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the National Geographic Society. During his seven-month, 60,000-mile (96,000-kilometer) "Megaflyover"—an aerial survey of Africa—in 2004 he saw two sides of the continent.

There were places where human actions have brought entire ecosystems to the brink of collapse, as well as surprisingly large regions where wild animals abound and people live sustainably on the land.

"Overall, I was more impressed than depressed by what I saw," Fay said. "Many Africans have figured out what they need to do to save their environment and themselves."

From his small Cessna airplane, Fay saw some remarkable sites, including hundreds of hippos stuck in the mud, vast herds of antelope on their annual migrations, and elephants and humans living side by side.

—David Braun

More on the Megaflyover

Aerial Survey Documents Africa's Last Wild Places

Interview With Africa Explorer J. Michael Fay

Map and Photo Gallery

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