PHOTOS: Oldest "Human" Skeleton Refutes "Missing Link"

Ardipithecus
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The bones of the "Ardi" skeleton were extremely fragile, requiring unusually meticulous excavation techniques (pictured, the scientists at work) and years of preparation in the laboratory.

In addition to the hominid bones themselves, scientists uncovered a wealth of other specimens from the site, including fragments of large mammals, tiny shrews, plant seeds, pollen, and even fossilized dung beetle balls.

All this information helped confirm that Ardi lived in a woodland environment.
—Photograph courtesy Dr. Tim White
 
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