PHOTOS: "Unusual" Sea Volcano Spews Acid, Grows Fast

 PHOTOS:
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The Jason ROV captures carbon dioxide bubbles by placing a funnel over the NW Rota-1 volcano in April 2009.

Volcanic plumes behave completely differently underwater than on land, where eruption clouds emit steam, ash, and invisible gases, said project chief investigator Bill Chadwick, an Oregon State University volcanologist.

In the ocean, steam condenses and disappears, leaving clear bubbles of carbon dioxide and a very acidic, dense cloud of molten sulfur, which is formed by sulfur dioxide mixing with seawater, Chadwick said in a statement.
—Photograph courtesy WHOI
 
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