GLOWING ANIMALS: Pictures of Beasts Shining for Science

GLOWING ANIMALS: Pictures of Beasts Shining for Science
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Cat


How does it glow?


Red fluorescent protein, introduced via a virus into cloned DNA, which was implanted in cat eggs, then implanted in mother (2007)

What can we learn?

Scientists at Gyoengsang National University in South Korea both cloned a Turkish Angora house cat and made it fluorescent—as shown in the glowing cat (left) photographed in a dark room under ultraviolet light. (The nonfluorescent cat, at right, appears green in these conditions.)

The scientists weren't the first to clone a cat--they weren't even the first to clone a fluorescent cat. But they were the first to clone a cat that fluoresces red.

It's hoped that the red glow, which appears in every organ of the cats, will improve the study of genetic diseases.
—Photograph by Choi Byung-kil/Yonhap via AP
 
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