GLOWING ANIMALS: Pictures of Beasts Shining for Science

GLOWING ANIMALS: Pictures of Beasts Shining for Science
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Dog


How does it glow?

Red fluorescent protein, introduced via a virus into cloned DNA (2009)

What can we learn?

In the same city that gave the world its first cloned, fluorescent-red cat, another group of Seoul scientists--this time at Seoul National University--engineered the world's first cloned, fluorescent red dog on April 26, 2009.

Ruppy the beagle--a combination of "ruby" and "puppy"--is the first successful clone of a genetically modified dog.

Believe it or not, the glow wasn't the point of the experiment--just evidence of the genetically modified nature of the beast.

The ability to clone genetically modified dogs should improve the study of human genetic diseases in dogs, such as Parkinson's, according to the research team.
—Photograph courtesy Seoul National University via AP
 
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