Bird-Watching Column: At Home With Hooded Orioles

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I was so mad at this oriole that I decided to punish him that afternoon, so I removed the oriole feeder from the lemon tree and placed it on the patio table, where I knew the oriole wouldn't venture, even for sugar water.

I felt really bad all afternoon, but I hoped that the oriole would learn a lesson—that is, to be nicer to me. The next morning, I positioned myself at the same spot I had occupied the day before. This time, the oriole arrived twice during a time span of about an hour, but each time, he let me take three pictures of him—and I have to manually advance my film. For the second series of shots, the oriole allowed me to move in from 35 feet to about 28 feet away—this with a 2x teleconverter attached to my 200-500mm lens set at 500mm.

Did the oriole think about his afternoon sans feeder, and did he make a special effort to pose for me the following day? I'd like to think so.

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