Scientists Develop Laser "Tweezers"

World Entertainment News Network
May 7, 2001

Scientists in Scotland have developed a way of holding and rotating objects as small as a hamster chromosome.

They use special lasers which allow scientists to examine the microscopic material from any angle. The tool could be used in work on living cells or in the construction of micro-machines.

Researchers at the University of St. Andrews have been able to use their technique to maneuver glass beads one hundred times narrower than a human hair.

They also rotated a hamster chromosome to show their invention's potential for studying structures inside a cell. Scientists already use "optical tweezers" which hold objects in tightly focused laser beams, but the new technique will give them more control.

Kishan Dholakia published his work in the journal Science. He says, "We've rotated several different structures to show the range of things one can do."

(c) 2001 World Entertainment News Network

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