Travel News

For years, Bali was a peaceful enclave in conflict-ridden Indonesia. The popular tourist destination attracted 1.5 million visitors just last year. But on October 12, the peace was shattered when a car bomb exploded outside a tourist-packed nightclub, killing over 180 people. Now, few visitors are likely to return anytime soon. Here Traveler Editor Keith Bellows talks about the future of Bali's travel industry, alternative island getaways, and more.

Visit the Seychelles, an archipelago of 115 remote islands off the coast of Africa, and you'll find hardly a footprint in the sand. The islands have remained largely untouched and unchanged over the years because of enlightened tourism policies. Traveler Editor in Chief Keith Bellows, having just returned from a trip to the Seychelles, talks about why this corner of the world is truly remarkable, and why it just might stay that way.

Most Americans wouldn't think of vacationing in the Middle East, but the region of 24 countries—from Turkey to Saudi Arabia—offers a rich and diverse history. So don't let a few hot spots scare you away. National Geographic Traveler magazine editor Keith Bellows shares some savvy traveling advice.

A glorious testament to the artistic and intrinsic value of trash stands in the middle of the northern Indian city of Chandigarh, the capital of India's Punjab state. Called the "Rock Garden," this sprawling amusement "kingdom" has been made completely from waste material. Created by celebrated artist Nek Chand, the garden highlights the value of materials many people consider trash.

The omission of sustainable tourism from the agenda of the UN World Summit on Sustainable Development, wrapping up in Johannesburg today, was almost unfathomable, says National Geographic Traveler Editor-in-Chief Keith Bellows. "It's astounding that tourism wasn't front and center in the discussions, because it's central to the economies of most countries—and arguably among the three biggest industries in the world."

In the most ambitious study of marine life ever undertaken in the United States, scientists spent a month recently counting the fish in the Florida Keys. The underwater census is part of a campaign to save endangered fish stocks in South Florida and restore the shrinking Dry Tortugas, the largest living coral reef in North America.

More than 300,000 people a year make the trek to Peru to marvel at the extensive stone ruins of Machu Picchu, the best known Inca landmark. Now, that overwhelming interest may be putting Machu Picchu at risk.

The story of U.S. Route 66 is the story of two roads—the one that existed and carried Americans west, and the emblematic road celebrated by an important novel, a song, a beat poet, a TV show, and endless nostalgia.

National Geographic Today co-host Susan Roesgen talks to National Geographic Traveler magazine editor-in-chief Keith Bellows on the the opportunities that have opened up for the leisure traveler now that the U.S. business climate has cooled.

National Geographic Today co-host Susan Roesgen talks to National Geographic Traveler magazine editor-in-chief Keith Bellows on his publication's annual photography contest and a special upcoming issue on "50 Places of a Lifetime."

National Geographic Today co-host Susan Roesgen interviews National Geographic Traveler editor-in-chief Keith Bellows about French Polynesia. Underwater photographer David Doubilet joins the discussion and shares his insights on making images in the coral-lagoon paradise.

Jackson Square is a popular area with the throngs of strangers who visit New Orleans each year. But the square is also home to a number of full-time residents, including some who live in apartments that were among the first built in America.

Tom Foreman, co-anchor of the TV news show National Geographic Today, talked with Traveler magazine editor Keith Bellows about what's new in theme parks.

Susan Roesgen, co-anchor of the TV news show National Geographic Today, talked with Traveler magazine editor Keith Bellows about ideas on where to go when you need a vacation but time is limited.


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