Space News

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This week: "Cavemen" hang on in China, comets crash, man-size fish caught, passenger spaceship design unveiled, and mud fills classroom.

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Stunning color images offer new evidence that plentiful water once percolated through Martian bedrock—and new hints as to where life might be hiding.

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Saturn's moon Enceladus is sandblasting other nearby moons with giant geysers of ice, making the moons appear brighter, research shows.

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Mars may still house large reservoirs of the water and carbon dioxide that once formed the planets ancient atmosphere, new research suggests.

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An exotic form of diamond found only in Brazil and the Central African Republic may have brought to Earth by an asteroid, new research suggests.

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Comet McNaught—the brightest comet in 40 years—could be the last thing sky-watchers see if they aren't careful, astronomers warn.

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The latest x-ray image of the remains of an exploded massive star reveals that the star died in a thermonuclear blast, astronomers say.

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A new project plans to detect low-frequency signals sent by alien civilizations—from military radar to the ET version of talk radio.

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The Internet giant has signed on to help make data from what will be the largest sky survey readily available to the public.

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The discovery of eight tiny galaxies near our own may provide scientists with insights into the structure of the universe.

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Based on a new infrared image, the iconic space formation was likely destroyed 6,000 years ago—but we won't see it happen for another thousand years.

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The first observed trio of these enormous, hyperactive black holes offers insights into galaxy collisions that took place in the cosmic past.

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A pulsating star, or pulsar, in the Crab Nebula may be the first known celestial body to have more than two poles, astronomers said Monday.

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Scientists have created a detailed, three-dimensional map of dark matter's evolution over time—revealing that the mysterious substance forms the scaffolding for stars and galaxies.

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Titan has lakes of methane and a hydrological cycle that resembles in uncanny detail the one found on Earth, a new study finds.


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