Space News

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Circular pits on the surface of Mars appear to be openings to underground caverns, researchers say, and may be the most promising places to look for signs of life.

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New York to London in one hour? Hypersonic passenger service may not be far off, thanks to a new agreement between NASA and billionaire Richard Branson.

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A new method for sending quantum messages farther than ever before may lead to tiny, ultrafast computers and a satellite system for delivering super-secure messages, experts say.

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The U.S. Air Force is preparing to test a new vehicle that could make missiles—and someday, jets—travel ten times faster than those flown today.

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Saturn's moon Enceladus may be one of the most likely places in the solar system to have life, and it may have gotten off to a hot, highly radioactive start, scientists say.

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Want to know what a thousand black holes look like? This new NASA image reveals the largest sample ever taken of the mysterious, light-swallowing giants.

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Experts across the U.S. are aiming to design the weapon of choice for diverting comets and asteroids that could be on a collision course with Earth.

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Curious deposits on Mars that originally appeared to be signs of an ancient ocean were instead produced by water emerging from underground, a new study finds.

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The first direct evidence of the so-called YORP effect shows that heat from the sun can speed up or slow down an asteroid's spin, according to a trio of new studies.

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The total eclipse of the moon on March 3-4 promises a rare sky show. Find out if you'll be able to see it, and learn how it happens.

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Twin NASA spacecraft have beamed back spectacular views of the sun, helping scientists track violent solar storms that can fry satellites and overload power lines on Earth.

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Ice caps are melting on both Earth and Mars. According to one researcher's controversial theory, this suggests that global warming has nothing to do with humankind.

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At NASA's planned lunar base, the first residents may mine the surface, build telescope arrays, and perform on TV. But first they'll have to learn how to walk.

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New proposals to defend Earth from cataclysmic impacts range from a tugboat-like spaceship to arrays of giant scopes that can better scan the skies, scientists said today.

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This week: "Cavemen" hang on in China, comets crash, man-size fish caught, passenger spaceship design unveiled, and mud fills classroom.


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