Space News

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New analysis of the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa shows evidence that surface materials on the low-gravity object not only stick around but also are sorted by periodic shaking.

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An explosive image of a dozen stars' birth pangs marks the anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope, 17 years after it was borne into space by the shuttle Discovery.

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NASA has released long-awaited images of the star of the latest 3-D blockbuster—shot by twin spacecraft orbiting the sun.

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Cosmic rays produced at the edge of our galaxy have devastated life on Earth every 62 million years, according to a new study.

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Wind and radiation from massive, superhot stars can blow away planet-forming materials around smaller stars within a ten-trillion-mile radius, a new study suggests.

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Infrared cameras recently captured an image of the Red Square Nebula, a rare cloud of dust and gas so symmetrical that a scientist deemed it "almost perfect."

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Blue forests? Orange meadows? NASA scientists may be able to determine the colors of extraterrestrial plants while studying distant planets, new research shows.

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For the first time, astronomers have detected water in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system, according to a new study.

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Gusty winds are sweeping away dust and making Mars's surface darker, contributing to planetary warming, experts say.

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A new NASA image colors our the gas giant in a surprising new light (namely purple), depicting gargantuan auroras ignited by volcanic particles.

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For the second time in 11 years, a brightly colored galaxy is garnering worldwide attention for housing a brilliant supernova.

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A bizarre, six-sided cloud formation that extends deep into the atmosphere could be a key to solving the mystery of how fast the gas giant is spinning.

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A space rock the size of three football fields may have slammed into California more than 35 million years ago, leaving a crater more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) wide.

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Scientists are working on a new nanotech material that may be light enough and sturdy enough to protect deep-space astronauts from deadly interstellar radiation.

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Circular pits on the surface of Mars appear to be openings to underground caverns, researchers say, and may be the most promising places to look for signs of life.


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