Space News

image

See a roundup of this week's news: New neutron star discovered, German police test gyrocopter, Egyptians seek sand treatment, and more.

image

The first image of the rings taken by a ground-based telescope is allowing astronomers to gain new insight by peeking where the sun doesn't often shine.

image

A new study of massive colliding galaxy clusters raises "uncomfortable" questions about our understanding of dark matter, scientists say.

image

See pictures of the damage in Mexico and Belize caused by Dean after the powerful storm slammed into the Yucatan Peninsula.

image

Amid concerns over a gash in the craft and an oncoming hurricane, Endeavour's seven-member crew touched down in Florida no worse for the wear.

image

Satellite imagery and scenes of destruction illustrate the first chapter of the storm's story as it heads for Mexico and the U.S.

image

A new theory of how Enceladus' famous geysers work could put hopes of water—and maybe life—on ice.

image

The star Mira is shedding material rich in the basic building blocks of stars, planets, and potential life—a "completely new and unexpected" find.

image

As NASA readies a permanent lunar outpost for the 2020s, some scientists want to see a "lunar ark" of Earth's civilization in the event of a cataclysmic impact.

image

A new window into space has allowed astronomers to glimpse unusually large, tumultuous galaxies where stars constantly collide.

image

See a roundup of the week's news: coal mine collapse in Utah, record-breaking battery-operated car, giant sea bloom, and more.

image

A moonless night sky on August 12 will offer a clear view of the annual bevy of "shooting stars," with as many as one or two a minute appearing during prime hours.

image

Jupiter may develop self-esteem issues. A puzzling new planet is nearly twice as big—but weighs only three-quarters as much.

image

Four galaxies are crashing into each other in one of the largest celestial smashups ever seen, forming a new galaxy that will be ten times the size of the Milky Way.

image

Planets like Jupiter and Saturn may form much more easily than previously believed, hints a study of red giant stars.


ADVERTISEMENT

 
NEWS FEEDS     After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.   After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

Podcasts
National Geographic News, Videos, and More