Photo: Satellite Tags to Solve Hammerhead Mating, Migration Mysteries?



In addition to nostrils, great hammerhead sharks have hundreds of olfactory pores on their snouts. The position of the eyes—one at either end of the hammer—gives them a broader range of sight.

Hammerheads and other sharks use pore-like electrical sensors embedded in their skin known as ampullae of Lorenzini to help nab prey at ultra-close range. In the case of great hammerheads, that prey includes stingrays hiding on the ocean floor.

Reports describe the shark holding down a stingray with its hammer, while sheering off pieces of its wings to eat.

Photo by Brian Skerry/National Geographic/Getty Images


NEWS FEEDS    After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed. After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS

ADVERTISEMENT

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC'S PHOTO OF THE DAY

50 Drives of a Lifetime

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.