National Geographic News
An aerial photo of the Grand Canyon.

The confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers, an area considered sacred to Native Americans, is under consideration as the site of a billion-dollar development project.

Photograph by L.Romano/ De Agostini/ Getty

Amanda J. Crawford

for National Geographic

Published August 14, 2014

At the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon, well beyond the tourists who crowd along the South Rim, sagebrush desert stretches for miles, almost untouched except by wild horses or the livestock of Navajo herdsmen. Below, the turquoise water of the Little Colorado River flows into the larger and darker Colorado, their courses merging within the burnt sienna walls of the canyon. The confluence is considered sacred to some Native Americans—and awe-inspiring to others fortunate enough to visit the remote spot.

"Every time I go, I think about my place in the universe," says R. Lamar Whitmer, a Scottsdale, Arizona, developer. "When you look at God or the creator's handiwork, you can't help but feel special or that you are part of something."

That's why Whitmer says he wants to make this special part of the Grand Canyon accessible to the world. He and his partners are working with the Navajo Nation to build the Grand Canyon Escalade, a billion-dollar development with hotels, restaurants, shops, and a Navajo cultural center on the desolate canyon rim, almost 30 miles from the closest highway.

Map of the Grand Canyon
VIRGINIA W. MASON, NG STAFF. SOURCE: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Tourists who may not otherwise be able to visit the floor of the canyon could ride a gondola to the confluence a mile below. There they would stroll on an elevated walkway and take in the stunning view from stadium-style seating.

"In a world hungry for harmony and beauty, can you think of a better place than the Grand Canyon?" Whitmer asks.

The plan, now pending before the Navajo Nation Council, has caused division on the reservation and with other tribes, including the Hopi, who say the canyon, and the confluence in particular, are sacred and should not be disturbed.

It has also caused alarm in the National Park Service and among conservationists, who warn that the proposed development—along with another commercial project at the park's main entrance on the South Rim—could alter the canyon forever.

The controversy raises prickly questions about the nature of sacred spaces, how best to protect natural wonders like the Grand Canyon, and who should have access to, and profit from, public lands.

A photo of a group of visitors at Hopi Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.
Visitors look into the Grand Canyon from Hopi Point on the South Rim, in this image from 1955.
Photograph by Justin Locke, National Geographic

A Place Revered but Vulnerable

"The Grand Canyon is a place that people come to be awed by Mother Nature's work over millions of years," said Grand Canyon National Park Superintendent David Uberuaga, who calls the threats facing the park the gravest in its 95-year history.

"It is a World Heritage site, one of the Seven Wonders of the World—and that is not a place that needs additional development. It is not a place to be entertained, but a place to come to connect to creation and this experience."

Carved by the Colorado River over millions of years, the Grand Canyon has been occupied by humans for more than 10,000 years. It plays an important role in the creation stories and religious practices of several Native American tribes who now have reservation land near the canyon, along its rim, or on its floor.

"The Grand Canyon is our spiritual home," explains Leigh Kuwanwisiwma, director of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office. "It is the point of our emergence. It is also our final spiritual resting place."

The canyon was protected as a Forest Reserve in 1893, and it became a national park in 1919. President Theodore Roosevelt famously implored that the canyon be left forever in its natural condition. "You cannot improve on it," he said in 1903. "The ages have been at work on it, and man can only mar it."

A photo of Hopi women weaving baskets in 1937.
Concentrating on their handiwork, Hopi Indians in May 1937 weave baskets in a community near the Grand Canyon.
Photograph by Michael Ledger, Getty

The number of visitors has swelled a hundredfold since its inception as a national park, to about 4.5 million visitors a year—a number Uberuaga says is straining the park's capacity. There have been constant efforts to commercialize it, industrialize its resources, and pilfer its archaeological treasures. Stewards have struggled to protect it while sharing it with the world.

Today the threats to the canyon's future are "real and ongoing," Uberuaga says. Despite a 2012 ban on new uranium mines on a million acres of public land around the park, the canyon's waterways are still at risk of pollution from grandfathered mines and those on nearby state land, he says.

Meanwhile, the wilderness experience on the canyon floor, where the park limits river trips to 25,000 individuals a year, is being disrupted in some parts by noise overhead. An estimated 300,000 flights annually now cross over the canyon, Uberuaga says.

Air traffic could increase even more with proposals to expand the state of Arizona's Grand Canyon Airport and flights at the Hualapai Tribe's Grand Canyon West. The seven-year-old development on the west side of the canyon, home of the popular glass Skywalk attraction, became accessible to tourists by a paved road in early August. Up to a thousand people a day take helicopter trips to Hualapai land in the canyon, then embark on short boat trips on the river, Uberuaga says.

But the planned developments to the south and on Navajo land to the east are raising the most concern because of their scale and location.

A photo of the famous
Employees in 1949 perform the "sing away" ceremony, a popular farewell to visitors leaving the Grand Canyon Lodge, on the North Rim.
Photograph by NPS, EDEN

Grand Plans for Gateway Community

At the South Rim of the canyon, outside the main entrance of Grand Canyon National Park, sits Tusayan, Arizona, a modest collection of hotels, restaurants, gifts shops, and a National Geographic IMAX theater. For the past two decades the Stilo Development Group, backed by Italian investors, has sought to build out the gateway community but has been thwarted by a variety of obstacles.

After county voters nixed a proposed project, Stilo became the "driving force" behind a 2010 campaign to incorporate the town, town manager Will Wright explained in a phone interview. The strategy worked, and soon after incorporation, the town approved Stilo's plans to build some three million square feet of commercial space with luxury hotels, upscale shops, spas, a dude ranch, and more than 2,000 homes.

Town leaders foresee many benefits of the project, including 20 or more acres they will get to build affordable housing for tourism workers. "It's an opportunity to establish a community where you have residents who can sink roots and take a more active role," Wright says.

Opponents worry about a sustainable water source, and whether a town incorporated to facilitate growth will apply appropriate scrutiny.

"This isn't about housing," counters Alicyn Gitlin, coordinator for the Sierra Club's Grand Canyon protection campaign. "This is about a very large scale, commercial development going in adjacent to the national park." The Sierra Club is pushing a proposal to protect 1.7 million acres of the area around the park as a national monument.

"People come to the region to get a sense of place of the desert landscape in which the Grand Canyon is situated," Gitlin says. "All of these things are industrialization of the landscape around this park. They are impacts occurring on a scale that wasn't predicted when these parks were created."

A view of the skywalk over the Grand Canyon.
The glass floor of the Skywalk gives visitors a unique view of the Grand Canyon. The site is managed by the Hualapai Tribe.
Photograph by John Burcham, National Geographic Creative

Weighing Gains and Losses

Back on the east side of the canyon, the proposed Grand Canyon Escalade project—the largest ever tourism venture by the Navajo Nation—promises to create 2,000 jobs on-site and as many as 1,500 indirectly. That on a reservation struggling with high unemployment and pockets of desperate poverty, says Deswood Tome, special adviser to Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly, who is backing the project.

The area around the remote site is so undeveloped that most residents don't have running water or electricity. The dire conditions are due to the Bennett Freeze, a ban on development imposed during a land dispute with the Hopi that lasted more than 40 years. Congress officially lifted the freeze in 2009.

A photo of Sierra Club members protesting the projected building of two dams in the Grand Canyon in 1966
Protesters in 1966 hold signs to show their opposition to the proposed building of two dams in the Grand Canyon. They succeeded in blocking construction.
Photograph by Arthur Schatz, The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty

That's when Whitmer says he reached out to former Navajo Nation President Albert Hale (now a state representative) and other partners to build a tourist development there. The Navajo, who are being asked to invest $65 million for a road and other infrastructure, would earn 8 to 18 percent of receipts, Whitmer says. The tribe stands to make $40 million to $70 million annually, Tome says. If the Navajo Nation Council approves the development agreements in the next several months, the 420-acre Escalade could open by May 2018—in time for the national park's centennial.

"If the National Park Service and the Hualapai Tribe and other entities are making a profit off the Grand Canyon, who are they to say the Navajo Nation cannot do that?" Tome asks.

The tribe and the park service disagree over who controls the land by the river where the lower part of the project is planned. The Navajo say their reservation starts at the river, while the park service claims its boundary goes a quarter mile up. Uberuaga says the park service would use its jurisdiction to stop development there. The Navajo Nation will exert its sovereignty, Tome says. "We're not going to acquiesce to the National Park Service whatsoever."

The project is also likely to be challenged by the Hopi, Kuwanwisiwma says. The Hopi Salt Trail runs along the Little Colorado River by the confluence and onto the sipapuni, or place of emergence, upstream.

A photo of a Navajo man returning to his home on a reservation.
A Navajo looks out over the land on his return to his reservation home.
Photograph by Maggie Steber, National Geographic Creative

Although Whitmer and Tome insist that the project avoids all designated sacred sites that require protection, the project has caused a divide among the Navajo people. Some families who historically resided in the area, along with their supporters, have formed a vocal opposition. And some candidates challenging Shelly for the nation's presidency in an August 26 primary election have come out against Escalade too.

Renae Yellowhorse, part of the Save the Confluence group, says the pristine area where clan stories say life began is the wrong place for development. Her elderly relatives who live in the area worry, "Where are our prayers going to go?"

"It's not for an outsider to tell me what is sacred," Yellowhorse says. "I say it is sacred because I go out there and pray and give my offerings, not because it is on some map or written in some book."

Whitmer says the special nature of the spot is exactly why he wants to build there: "The way you strengthen the world's spirituality is you share it," he says.

59 comments
David Smith
David Smith

 Well, you could put the whole thing UNDERGROUND, with cleverly-hidden cave-shaped windows hidden in cracks in the rock. Instead of a sissy gondola, exposed and cluttering up the cliffs, put in a tunnel ride. Use the amphitheater for Native American ceremonies and dance. Employ a visionary architect to keep it humble, naturally-shaped, hidden and respectful of the majesty of this incredible space. Show some class! 

I side with those who prefer the wilderness to be as untouched as possible. If there is any development at all, it should be aggressively hidden and restrained. Don't build another cheaply-designed, crassly commercial eyesore.  

Judith Stone
Judith Stone

If you are as disgusted with tactics used from the conquering government's 1800's handbook by these developers as I am, please join me in supporting save the confluence,www.savetheconfluence.com, begun by Renae Yellowhorse  when she saw how Navajo people who live near the confluence were lied to and tricked about giving initial support for the project.

By the time residents understood what the proposed development really was, sitting Tribal Chairman, Ben Shelly, had already given his approval. This is how the greedy liars oops, I meant developers, claim to have the people's support-how disgusting!

 Sounds like history repeating itself, like when one sub-chief signed a government treaty (that he was tricked into signing) then the U.S. government claimed the sub-chief was a spokesperson for the entire nation and used its false document to take away sacred lands, herding Natives onto reservations to die.

Judith Stone
Judith Stone

The Hopi's have a prophecy which says (and I'm paraphrasing) that the Navajos must help the Hopi but if they fail to help them then the Anglos must help the Hopi or the world will see it's demise. 

This white girl stands up and helps Hopi not because it fulfills one of their prophecies but because no man has a right to destroy the sacred birthplace of humanity; only the one who created it has any right to destroy it. 

Whose words am I gong to listen to? Let's see, on the one hand there is God, the Creator who taught his children how to live and take care of this sacred place and on the other hand, there's a greedy bunch of unethical (look all of them up and see for yourself) men talking in our ears about how its time to give this ancient place the razzle-dazzle bells and whistles of the greedy, money, hungry world.

Hmm? Which one should I listen to? A no-brainer.

Judith Stone
Judith Stone

"If the National Park Service and the Hualapai Tribe and other entities are making a profit off the Grand Canyon, who are they to say the Navajo Nation cannot do that?" Tome asks.

Now, here lies the developers/supporters real rub and their desperation to continue plowing on with this project.

 A Navajo who lives by the spiritual laws given to them by the Creator and passed down by speaking these laws to their children, would NEVER consider desecrating their sacred place where life began.In fact, I know Navajo families who make an annual pilgrimage to teach their children about the confluence and to pray there.  

 It certainly is easy to know which tribal leaders know nothing about their own tribes spiritual histories, which ones were raised or lived off of the reservation; all one has to do is listen.

Judith Stone
Judith Stone

Who is Whitmer to decide whether a sacred place, sacred wisdom or sacred ceremony should be shared or not? Especially because Whitmer's motivation for his sudden spiritual shift in consciousness has everything to do with reaping 88% of the profits! Due to his over-inflated ego he fails to realize (as do the rest of the developers of this project) that every time he/they open their mouths more opposition mounts against them because they truly are like transparent sheets of paper and everyone who doesn't  stand to make money on this project see right through them!

Janice Dobis
Janice Dobis

Just because you can does not mean you should!!!


What a horrible vision!  i have visited this amazing place twice. The depth of the emotion I felt as I stood at the base, with those awe inspiring walls encircling me, could never be expressed in words.  It remains the most spiritual moment of my life.  In the silence there I am certain I heard God's voice wisper to me that this place is just one of His gifts to us.


It is also the first national park I took my 190 year old daughter to.  We hiked the down to Supai and swam in the falls.  It was so amazing! It is a raw beauty that can never be improved upon. As for making it more assessable to those who could never make the hike down.. there is something to be said about respecting who we are and reveering what nature is.  Somethings are meant to be out of our reach. Somethings need to be struggled for to truly appreciate. Each of us were not meant to have access to everything. The floor of the canyon is a most special place and you must earn your way there.  Cheating only deprives you of the blessing the difficult journey gives.  Any other way to obtain the moment is just a shallow experience that will profit not your soul but someone elses' wallet.  As for the stadium seating idea, YUCK!!!!!! It's not a Tiger's game, it is a natural wonder. Touch the dirt; sit on a rock; and look around you in all directions if you want to "see" and experience something natural.


I feel for the native people of this land, and for the hardships of living in this region brings, but to exploit the sacred to turn a dime can't be the answer. There has to be a better way.

Lo-Gray Wolf
Lo-Gray Wolf

Leave thee land as it is. only just a few will prosper and it will not be the poor nor thee middle income people. Also only the people with money will get to see thee land as ???? what. ~~~~~LGW 

Liliana Sanchez
Liliana Sanchez

This is also happening at our Gateway to the Angeles National Forest. Developers are trying to desecrate our hillside communities on Big Tujunga Canyon. 

follow us on fb at Stop the Canyon Park Development.

Les MacLean
Les MacLean

The Grand Canyon is one of the world's seven great natural wonders, and should remain that way without further commercial development.  I used to work at the Grand Canyon and, in my spare time, witnessed a mating season deer fight in the Grand Canyon Village, rode a helicopter over the canyon, rode a steam engine train through its wild above canyon country, and witnessed light play and color on the canyon following winter snowstorms.  Endangered species, such as the California condor, make the Grand Canyon its home.  As famed president and conservationist Theodore Roosevelt said, "Leave the canyon as it now is.  The ages have been at work on it, and man can only mar it."  We don't need a gondola as the bottom of the canyon is already accessible on foot or by mule train and we have more than enough hotels, shops, and restaurants.The Grand Canyon, or the "Great Chasm Drama", as I like to call it, is best left where God's unspoiled creation unfolds.

Les MacLean

Michael Shea
Michael Shea

"It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God."  Take that as the truth, Mr. Lamar Whitmer, because it is.  You can take it to the bank.   I'm grateful to know that you and everyone like you will be going somewhere else.  For you, the greatest good would be climbing Everest for the sake of carving Mickey Mouse on the east face in hopes of supporting your lemonade concession at the base of the mountain.  What egregious hypocrisy!  What foolishness!  In 100 years, no one will remember you, no one will care who you were or what you did, and your legacy will be a pile of garbage bobbing lazily down the Colorado River toward the Gulf of California.  Won't you feel proud then?!



Robert Bray
Robert Bray

"We must do this project in the name of God!"  I am so sick of hearing this sort of thing from pseudo Christian money mongers.  Absolutely ANYTHING is fair game to them when it comes to making money.

Jennifer Atack
Jennifer Atack

this is so so wrong to destroy what is so amazingly beautfiul - you would think the indians of all would know this

Christopher Ortega
Christopher Ortega

R.Lamar Whitmer, Albert Hale, Judge Michael C Nelson (retired from his position of honor), Eunice L. Tso, Keith Lamparter, Bernie Propst, Michele Crank, James Maguire, Deswood Tome, Ben Shelly.  


This is a list of participants (most of whom are listed proudly on the Confluence website at the time of this post) who are trying to make this happen.  I thought this list would be helpful for those who may want to reach out to their customers, employers, and/or constituents and let them know your feelings about this project.  Also, if you are in the market for a shady business contact to help you with your unscrupulous endeavour, then you also may find use of this list.


If you are a part of the latter group,then you better act fast.  There are not many projects where one can simultaneously sell out the heritage of multiple nations, sell your soul, attack one of the world's most amazing natural landscapes, and be on the wrong side of history.

Alan Axelrod
Alan Axelrod

If Whitmer had a clue about his place in the universe and had any respect at all for God's creation he would get the hubris and arrogance of his greed. I've been to the confluence - by dory.  You'd have to be brain-dead not to understand that the last thing the GC needs is this lame idea couched in disingenuous magnanimity. If you want to feel "special" and be part of something, get to the confluence under your own power and find no trace of man's folly.


If you are against this short-sighted development, at least sign the change.org petition opposing this project.  https://www.change.org/petitions/navajo-nation-president-ben-shelly-stop-plans-to-develop-the-grand-canyon 

craig hill
craig hill

Go ahead, Navajos, turn the east canyon into a noisy kindergarten playground while tribal politician-leaders skim the proceeds and little trickles down to the people who need it, so you can ruin the serenity and sacred quality of the place. A surefire lose-lose situation. 


What will really worry me is when they build roads to the much more beautiful North Rim and turn it into the permanent traffic jam the South Rim has become. Currently it's hard to get to and wildly better off for it.

Xenon Malamudx
Xenon Malamudx

For me, it's very simple. They will build over my dead body.

Bill Miller
Bill Miller

Why worry about it??  It's ruined already by infestations of tourists who insist on dressing in shorts to show off their knobby kneed chicken legs, and using waaaay too much perfume.  It stinks of asphalt and automobile exhaust.  It's a Disney sideshow now.  Anything spiritual about it has long since been trampled out and destroyed.

N A
N A

Don't worry, Ranae Yellowhorse, your prayers can go to the same place everyone else's go. Nowhere.

star messenger
star messenger

Greed is a mental illness that knows no bounds.  It constantly has to be fed with the destruction of things beautiful, and the bones of dead men (Native American bones).


When Europeans first set foot on the land called America, there were about 17 million Native Americans living on this land.  But, by the time the "Frontier" had reached the West Coast, there were only about 250,000 left.  We descendents of European stock sure know how to plunder and destroy everything of beauty.

This latest attack on the Grand Canyon is just one more example of human folly; all for the sake of a few paper dollars.  For all those who wish to plunder and destroy, this is going to be your end: 

Rev. 11:18 " The nations were angry; and your wrath has come. The time has come for judging the dead, and for rewarding your servants the prophets and your saints and those who reverence your name, both small and great-- AND FOR DESTROYING THOSE WHO DESTROY THE EARTH".

Ranger Dan Parsons
Ranger Dan Parsons

We pay farmers NOT to grow crops, so pay the Navajo NOT to build.

Jonathan Baer
Jonathan Baer

JOHN FISCHER 


IS A COMPLETE DUCHEBAG.  PLEASE SEE BELOW.

HE IS THE ESSENCE OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE NATURAL WORLD.

Ranger Dan Parsons
Ranger Dan Parsons

The behavior of a species that causes the extinctions of other species, kills for sport rather than sustenance, sullies its own habitat, gobbles up its resources at an ever increasing speed, and denies its affect on its own future is, in the English language, referred to as an infestation.  Congratulations to the Human species as the worst infestation of all time. 

Gwendolyn Mugliston
Gwendolyn Mugliston

When I read this article I got furious.  The rich very monied elite  just destroy and destroy and destroy and they make places we have loved all our lives inaccessible by cost.  In 2010 a relative and I took a trip throughout the SW. It was a repeat trip of one I had taken in 2001.  


In 2001 my husband and I visited virtually every national park and all the beautiful areas and cliff dwellings in the parks. We were awed and spiritually renewed. 


In 2010 those places were not available as some company now controlled access prices  and prices to go see, just SEE, the cliff houses.  The price to get in the park was still somewhat reasonable for me because I have an "Elder Pass"  but we could NOT afford the bus trip costs within the park to see places no longer allowed by private car.  We visited many, many national parks and it was very much the same everywhere.


Many areas were filthy with garbage where we could go--an outrage in my opinion.


And if I hadn't known better, listening to the foreign languages with the rare English speaker I would have thought I was in a foreign country.


My conclusion was the parks are no longer for all US Citizens to enjoy as a part of our birthright, but playgrounds for the rich elite both US and foreign.  


Disgusting.

Ed Kisselburg
Ed Kisselburg

Is nothing of value anymore? Why are we letting money hungry foreign interest destroy what belongs to us. It is the responsibility of all American peoples to protect our natural wonders from the greed of a few.

hi ho
hi ho

there are many places in the world that need to be saved because of their historic or natural importance. This is one of them.

John Fischer
John Fischer

Alright! Finally we are getting our priorities together. This project would open up the floodgates that have been holding back all of the great projects that most of the world would love to see but have been held up by irrational environmentalists and wilderness huggers - An escalator to a bar on top of Half Dome and El Cap, luxury cabins all along the Big Sur coast, a model RC aircraft runway at Yellowstone's Grand Prismatic Spring, a couple of tree house inns built among the branches of the biggest sequoias and tallest redwoods, etc., etc.  I want one of the first drinks on top of Half Dome!

Michael Shea
Michael Shea

@Christopher Ortega A list of the wisest and most honorable of businessmen and politicians, no doubt.  May I never have the pleasure.  These are the sort who would happily spread s... on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel if there were a nickel to be made by licking it off.


And, addressing the members of your list, in case any you wondered, I am a gainfully employed, highly educated tree hugger, and I have no respect for you.

craig hill
craig hill

@Bill Miller What you describe is fortunately only a relatively small part of its overall rim. It's good you think that way, right now the damage is concentrated, and access to the rest is being kept minimal for the lack of roads, praise the Tao.

craig hill
craig hill

@N A You don't get it either. Their prayers go to the Self they think is outside them.

craig hill
craig hill

@star messenger The same foolish book contradicts that by encouraging men to make every mountain flat and every plain its equal in height by sickeningly "subduing" this Paradise. 

Janice Dobis
Janice Dobis

@Gwendolyn Mugliston Though I do agree that geed is alive within the wealthy community, it is also quite alive in the poor ( many of whom feel entitled to that which they did not work for). But to use a blanket statement that seems to  cover the whole group of wealthy is ignorant, especially in light of your following statements of visiting the National Parks.  If you do your history, you will learn that we have the parks largely due to the foresight of many extremely wealthy and wise men and women who worked diligently to preserve these natural wonders and keep them public for all generations to enjoy.

Janice Dobis
Janice Dobis

@John Fischer Are you trying to be funny?  Cuz your humor lacks… well, humor! Why not just pop in a DVD or watch a PBS special from the comfort of your comfy recliner on your wall size TV screen w/surround sound and order your live-in to make you that drink? If you are at all serious, I can't imagine you would do well at the Canyon anyway.

Sarah Dwyer
Sarah Dwyer

@John Fischer I think you're right, I've been waiting for the constitution coaster for years now, just think how much fun it will be to ride the coaster to the top of the Washington monument, at the last second Lincoln(in the Lincoln memorial) lifts his feet as you zoom under him, followed by the loops around the capital building and then finally at the end of the ride ending on the national mall(which has been turned into a shopping mall because gap and starbucks are so hard to find usually).

star messenger
star messenger

@craig hill @star messenger Not to argue with you, but I can't find what you are referring to in Revelation.

However, there is a reference to something to that effect in Luke 5:5-6 "Every valley shall be filled , and every mountain and hill shall be brought low ; and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways shall be made smooth; 6 And all flesh shall see the salvation of God".  But, I don't think that these verses are to be taken in a literal sense, but as a metaphor. 


If you can show me the verse in Revelation that states, "make every mountain flat", I would appreciate it.

Olivia Trojanowski
Olivia Trojanowski

@Jonathan Baer Sorry to do this, it is you're* nor your; and yes, he does sound like an imbecile, however, there are many bored people whose dead parents left them with a fortune to burn through in their empty lives. 

Michael Shea
Michael Shea

@star messenger @craig hill  Maybe he means Isaiah 40:4-5, which reads (in the KJV), "Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain: and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it."  I wouldn't call Isaiah a "foolish book."  It isn't wise for a person to broadcast his ignorance to the world that way in a public forum such as this one.  It would be a good idea to study the book for awhile before publishing that sort of opinion.

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