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The discovery of additional materials from the hind fin ofTiktaalik roseae, a 375-million-year-old transitional fossil, suggest it was able to use its hind fins as props as well as paddles.

New fossil material from the pelvis of Tiktaalik roseae suggests it was able to use its hind fins as props as well as paddles.

ILLUSTRATION BY KALLIOPI MONOYIOS

Dan Vergano

National Geographic

Published January 13, 2014

One of the first "fish" to walk on land some 375 million years ago made its way with surprisingly strong hips and fins, report paleontologists.

Unearthed in the Canadian Arctic in 2006, Tiktaalik roseae, a genus of early land-walking fish, made headlines with news of its discovery, which was funded by the National Geographic Society. The new report fleshes out how our ancient four-limbed ancestors first made the move from water to land. (See pictures: "Nine Fish With 'Hands' Found to Be New Species.")

"They're big—the hips of Tiktaalik look very robust," says University of Chicago paleontologist Neil Shubin, who led the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The find suggests that the pelvic girdle changes that accompanied the move to land by vertebrates—animals with backbones such as Tiktaalik—"started in the water or, more accurately, in the swamp," he says. (Also see "Pictures: 'Walking' Fish a Model of Evolution in Action.")

Tiktaalik lived in marshy river settings resembling today's Amazon. Up to 9 feet (2.7 meters) long, the lobed fish hunted like a freshwater crocodile in rivers and inlets, and had a surprisingly agile neck and primitive lungs.

"We are really just getting a glimpse into one of the most fascinating transitions for vertebrates," says paleontologist Catherine Boisvert of Australia's Monash University.

A series of discoveries, including Tiktaalik and similar creatures over the past decade, she says, are opening up to scholars the time when animals—other than insects—first made the leap to land.

The newly discovered pelvis of Tiktaalik roseae, pictured here between a life-sized reconstruction (left) and a cast of the skeleton
PHOTOGRAPH BY KEVIN JIANG, THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
The newly discovered pelvis of Tiktaalik, pictured here between a life-sized reconstruction (left) and a cast of the skeleton (right).

Tale of Tiktaalik

Tiktaalik means "large, freshwater fish" in the language of the Nunavut people, who live in the region near its discovery site on Canada's frigid Ellesmere Island (map).

Shubin has nicknamed Tiktaalik the "fishapod," a play on the scientific "tetrapod" designation given to all four-legged animals and their descendants. (See also: "Tiktaalik Discovery Among National Geographic's Top Grants.")

"Our original discovery of Tiktaalik was so big that we had to split it into two parts, because we didn't have enough plaster," Shubin says. "This was the back end, and we were surprised to find a pelvis inside."

In addition to being much larger, proportionally, than the rear fin-supporting pelvis bones of a fish, Tiktaalik's hips point outward, more like a land animal's. The suspicion is that the creature propelled itself over mud flats and shallows with large, surprisingly well-articulated rear fins.

Until now scholars have known very little about the anatomical bridges between ancient fish and the much larger land creatures that came later, notes paleontologist Per Ahlberg of Sweden's Uppsala University.

"With the Tiktaalik material the preservation is so good that it will be possible to reconstruct aspects of the pelvic-fin musculature and the range of movement of the fin," Ahlberg said by email.

"This will really help us to understand the locomotory transformation from fish to tetrapod."

Land Dwellers

Why fish made the move to land 395 million years ago remains a bit of a mystery, says Boisvert. At the time, the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana was drifting toward the proto-North American continent. (Also see "Oldest Animal Discovered—Earliest Ancestor of Us All?")

"This drift created many shallow-water habitats, hence perfect places for something crocodile-like to thrive," she says. "These environments are also at the equator at that time, so it is nice and warm and tropical."

But there wasn't a lot to eat on land at the time for Tiktaalik, aside from spiders, scorpions, insects, and a few plants. Fewer predators or a safer place to lay eggs may have instead driven land creatures to evolve, some suggest.

"What we are seeing is that the transition to land was a real transition, not from the sea to land in one fell swoop," says Shubin, author of Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body.

"Creatures moved from open water to shallows, to marshes, to edges, before moving to land in a long, slow transition."

Follow Dan Vergano on Twitter.

17 comments
Emmanuel Fernandez
Emmanuel Fernandez

  • @Steven Smith   jajajjaja de Gente Cerrada de Que hay Dando Vueltas Nadie habla de Que No FUIMOS CREADOS Por Dios Sí estamos Buscando la Transición y FUE dios Quien Hizo Posible la Evolución. Por Que Tiene Que Ser Una Cosa o La Otra? Que Poco Respeto a la libertad de Con La Que dios nos doto al Nacer es Que Acaso pensaste Que literalmente dios Practico Formas humanoides de barro y LUEGO Salimos Nosotros como su Mejor versión y ASI Quedamos? Lo Que Si Quiere Decir Que es HUBO Formas de vida Anteriores Hasta Llegar a Nosotros y en la Cual la Naturaleza no es caprichosa en la forma de la Cual ESTAMOS Hechos Casi Todo Tiene Su Fundamento y la reminicencia evolutiva de algun antepasado. Ignorante e intolerante de los libres pensamientos

Emmanuel Fernandez
Emmanuel Fernandez

  • @Steven Smith   jajajjaja de Gente Cerrada de Que heno Dando Vueltas Nadie habla de Que No FUIMOS CREADOS Por Dios Sí solo esta Buscando la Transición y FUE dios Quien Hizo Posible la Evolución. Por Que Tiene Que Ser Una Cosa o La Otra? Que Poco Respeto a la libertad de Con La Que dios nos doto al Nacer es Que Acaso pensaste Que literalmente dios Practico Formas humanoides de barro y LUEGO Salimos Nosotros no Mejor Version de ASI Quedamos? Lo Que Si Quiere Decir Que es HUBO Formas de vida Anteriores Hasta Llegar a Nosotros y en la Cual la Naturaleza no es caprichosa en la forma de la Cual ESTAMOS Hechos Casi Todo Tiene Su Fundamento y la reminicencia evolutiva de algun antepasado 

Steven Smith
Steven Smith

I love how arrogant humanity has gotten to believe they could possibly exist without divine creation. They actually think they are so perfect that they can go from being a fish to being a two legged human being with brain that no know-it-all ignorant scientist will ever fully understand. Humanity is too imperfect to have possibly made it on our own without God. Evolution is the essence of lucifer. Carbon dating is demon possessed. This science in the end is a profession that will die out. A day will come when everyone will realize how wrong Charles Darwin was to make his baseless assumptions that jus cause to types of birds had different beaks they have developed them over millions of years. Ignorance may be bliss but the bliss of evolution ends in the pit!!!!!! And I don't care how harsh or scathing I seem when I say this because I speak the truth!!!

Sven Horvatić
Sven Horvatić

Great discovery, which will enable us to understand the transition from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyle! Good job!

Born Right
Born Right

Just brilliant! When Tiktaalik was originally described, I wished that the rear half of the animal would also be recovered. And here it is!

Peter Morgenroth
Peter Morgenroth

Tiktallik: a rather elderly vertebrate. "Walking?" What, I wonder would constitute proof of that hypothesis? Finding another specimen with a walking frame?

c b
c b

@Steven Smith  You need to do a bit of evolving yourself, friend. Set aside your religious brainwashing for a while and get some enlightenment.  It will do you good.  Oh, and, your hatred isn't making anybody sit up and take notice of you, but some insight would.  It's such a shame that they've gotten their doctrine embedded in your brain like that; I hope you soon find a way to see beyond the end of your nose and quit believing such hatred for other points of view.  You can't grow that way.  I wish you a happier road.   

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