National Geographic Daily News
10 comments
David Yearwood
David Yearwood

with modern technology at mans fingertips removing the container is nothing

Steven+ Leech
Steven+ Leech

Makes you wonder how and why they fall off the container ships,maybe they need a better anchoring system to prevent filling the ocean bottoms with this clutter..

Teresa Laine
Teresa Laine

have any of the sunken containers ever been opened and their contents revealed,especially ones from early disasters

Jeremy Arthur
Jeremy Arthur

I had no idea this happens, but it makes sense.

Chad King
Chad King

@David Yearwood  David, unfortunately it is cost-prohibitive to raise a container from almost a mile deep, in the millions, actually. In fact, the company paid $3 million for habitat restoration in other areas, along with deep-sea study of this particular container, and the fact that they lost 23 containers overall.

Andrew DeVogelaere
Andrew DeVogelaere

@Teresa Laine Modern containers have tracking numbers that lead to packing lists, so you can tell what is inside them without opening them.  In the case of this container, there are over 1,200 car tires.  No other containers have been studied in the deep, but many have washed ashore and been recovered or scavenged.  I like your idea though, it's like thinking of time capsules.  The early containers will become a history of what our societies used through time.  Some of these containers will persist of hundreds of years, if not longer.

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