National Geographic Daily News
23 comments
Alessandro Barbiano di Belgiojoso
Alessandro Barbiano di Belgiojoso

When I see ads of oil industry on your Magazine I doubt about your editorial freedom, when I see aesthetic images of ammunitions I doubt again.

Alessandro Belgiojoso

Member since 1978 

Pinky Brain
Pinky Brain

Well said, Mr. Geoffrey Cox. It is the art.

Geoffrey Cox
Geoffrey Cox

i think some comments betray a naive and personally distorted outlook. Gun buffs should appreciate the photography as an art form as intended. There is enough specialised information out there for them to research to their hearts content. The article deals well with what the normal viewer would wish to know. Too much detail will bring in argument over particular use of types of rounds and more moral clutter or nit picking by half informed opinion. Enjoy the images, make your own judgement and research the record and the web to find more. Criticism out of context can betray bias and ignorance. 

Nancy Smith
Nancy Smith

elementary my dear, this is merely appreciation for the art of what some call 'art'.  the art of any craftsman is subjective and of one trades craft, ammo and the art of weaponry (inclusive). lets not get our britches up our crack over someone's use of sampled and tradecraft (looks more like an advertisement for some manufacturing group to me anyway).  now let's see a half sawed through VanGogh and find out what he was up to when  he slathered his trade all over his canvas.  or take the David and MRI Scan it into pieces for fun.

Ray Gauthier
Ray Gauthier

Getting shot with any modern bullet (forbidden or illegal) is more humane and civilized then getting hacked up with a sword or axe, or bludgeoned with a stone or club as was the norm before firearms where invented. It wasn't  Hitler's bullets that decimated the Jewish population in Europe but the diabolical minds of the human species.I say minds,plural, because Hitler was not alone in the atrocities that took place. War and violence are as natural to the human species as mating,reproducing and eating. Bullets are a more civilizes means then many other weapons created by the human species. So if you want to really "conjure up the tragedies" of the brutal death and violence created by the individuals and/or governments of so called civilized  humanity, I think your time would be better spent else where.

Tom Mengel
Tom Mengel

The explanation of how a gun works was inaccurate in several areas and was a gross simplification about a complex subject (i.e. very few of today's guns use "Gunpowder" for example).  This probably would have best been handled by a link reference to writings that would have been more in depth or the how it works dialog simply left out.  If this was for Art's sake, let it stand as such and forgo the explanations.  

Anne Jane
Anne Jane

This article was not meant to be enjoyable. 

This article was not meant to gush over the beauty of bullets

This article was not meant to be informative about firearms.

You have missed the point of this article.

Thomas Macy
Thomas Macy

How come they do not have descriptions and specs of each cartridge, that would make this so much more enjoyable.  Not to mention a juxtaposition of the undisected cartridge and a frame of reference, would really add to this piece, would probably increase traffic National Geographic.

Terence Clark
Terence Clark

"When you pull the trigger on a gun, the trigger releases what's called a hammer, which hits the back of a cartridge, which catapults a bullet out into the air..." etc. etc.

This is another embarrassing example of a "journalist" reporting on something they know nothing about. This is a sophomoric explanation of how a firearm works, at best.

Most of the information is simply wrong. While some antique sidearms (late 1800's)  did have firing pins integrated into the hammer of the firearm, this is not something you will find in the majority of firearms made in the last 100 years. Most modern long guns don't have hammers at all. 

This would be like someone badly botching a description of how a steam engine works, and then making the representation that automobiles run on steam engines. 

There were certainly examples of steam driven automobiles over the years, (I believe Jay Leno owns a few) but these were the exception not the rule.

A call to almost any gunsmith in the world could have improved this article immensely. Instead its an embarrassment. 

The sad part of this is that the ammunition depicted in the photos is very specialized and unique. This is not standard ammo by any means. It would have been nice to hear a bit about the history of each piece. But sadly, that would have required some research and knowledge of firearms and ammunition.

I don't buy the "art" explanation for the lack of facts.


Marc Myers
Marc Myers

"Pearlman says that her photographs are meant to conjure up the tragedies that these objects have caused throughout human history."

-----------------------------------------------

Inanimate objects don't "cause" tragedies.  Human beings cause tragedies and did so quite enthusiastically for millennia before the invention of self-contained cartridges.  I, for one, would have found this article far more interesting with detailed explanations of why the internal structure of these cartridges vary so much.

Asok Smith
Asok Smith

These are cross sections of cartridges. Not "bullets". I guess correct language no longer matters at NG, at least when it comes to guns and bullets and stuff.

Mark Fergerson
Mark Fergerson

I'm familiar with many types of ammo and had no trouble identifying those photographed, but that wasn't the point of the piece. I also appreciate them as they were intended to be by the photographer, as a sort of "accidental art"; consider their intrinsic mechanical symmetry, the often surprising juxtapositions of color and texture of the various components, and the weirdly overall organic appearance of some of the rounds. There is usually some "art" in all "artifice".

Steve Doughty
Steve Doughty

Your childish description of the various ammunition configurations only add to the profound lack of understanding of guns and ammunition by the general public. Hire someone with basic knowledge in the subject to add you text.

Darren Loo
Darren Loo

Left to Right: AP, APFDS, HESH

:P Did I get em' correct?

Christian Duerig
Christian Duerig

There I live in Switzerland and I have no idea, where this bunker can be visited.  We have so many of them. It doesn't matter, because it's history. I still think the USA is doing better with submarines of the Virginia class. Enjoy your freedom. How long do we have to wait 'til a Virginia will be dissected ? History in the future ??? That will be exiting. What a huge bunker that will be. Colorado ?


Philip Lovelace
Philip Lovelace

Huh.  Count me with the folks who really want to know what the architecture does!

Phil Blank
Phil Blank

"Dissecting Weapons"?

Wrong title!

Dissecting ammo, or ammunition or bullets or cartridges.

Dissecting weapons, no!

Travis Smith
Travis Smith

@Terence Clark Very well said. Shell's and the weapons that use them are pieces of art in and of themselves but not in the way this "writer" thinks.

Charles Guo
Charles Guo

@Asok Smith What's funny is that the author actually has already said exactly this - cartridges, not bullets. Apparently the title of this article is not her choice but the editor's, and the latter hasn't even bothered to read it.

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