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Name bracelets in a market in Playa del Carmen, Mexico.

Brightly colored name bracelets are sold as souvenirs in Playa del Carmen, Mexico.

Photograph by Bryan Mullennix, Spaces Images/Corbis

Brian Clark Howard

National Geographic

Published July 24, 2013

Updated on July 25, 2013 at 11:00 AM

The newest prince of England has been given a name: George Alexander Louis. Choosing a name is often serious business for parents. And it's no wonder, given that a number of psychological studies have shown that a person's name can influence subsequent events in their life.

The new prince's father, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, was named William Arthur Philip Louis at birth. His father, Charles, Prince of Wales, was called Charles Philip Arthur George by his royal parents.

That's a pattern that bestowed four "first" names and no "last" or surname. Each of those first names was chosen to honor past monarchs and royal relatives in a long line of the House of Windsor.

For commoners, however, there is a great deal more flexibility when it comes to names.

Some parents choose to name their offspring after their interests, such as ESPN (pronounced Espen) or Jed I. Knight. (Note: These are both real names.)

Psychologists have also noticed that some people take up professions that seem somewhat predetermined, based on their names. In a phenomenon called aptonyms, examples include the American Heart Association's Cherish Hart, basketball player Tyce Tallman, Mike Blackbird of the Audubon Society, and the aptly named accountant Sandi Cash.

Then there are the really unusual names.

In 1999, parents in New Zealand named their daughter Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii, although a judge legally changed the girl's name when she was nine years old.

The judge said, "The court is profoundly concerned about the very poor judgment that this child's parents have shown in choosing this name. It makes a fool of the child and sets her up with a social disability and handicap, unnecessarily," according to the Guardian.

In his ruling, the judge included a list of already-prohibited names on the New Zealand books. Among them: Stallion, Yeah Detroit, Fish and Chips, Twisty Poi, Keenan Got Lucy, and Sex Fruit. Names that made the cut included Midnight Chardonnay, Number 16 Bus Shelter, Violence, and a set of twins called Benson and Hedges.

Such unusual names are not limited to New Zealand, though. Celebrities have long been known to give their progeny unusual names, from Frank Zappa's choice of Moon Unit, Dweezil, Ahmet, and Diva, to Gwyneth Paltrow's kids Apple and Moses, to Kanye West and Kim Kardashian's daughter North West.

Among regular folks, unusual American girls' names in 2012 included Jagger, Couture, Excel, Yoga, and Sanity, according to Babycenter.com. For boys, the site listed Vice, Xenon, Mango, Drifter, and Hippo.

Even if a person's name is more common, psychologists have wondered for years if their moniker could impact their lot in life.

How Names Are Perceived

In their bestselling book Freakonomics and on their blog, Stephen J. Dubner and Steven D. Levitt noted that different races and classes tend to have different preferences for names. Wealthier families tend to choose female names that seem strong, such as Elizabeth or Rachel, and male names that seem less forceful, such as Florian or Julian, they wrote. Lower-income families tend to follow the opposite pattern, although specific names tend to cycle in popularity between the classes over time.

Sometimes the sound of someone's name is used to discriminate against them, the authors wrote. It can be part of overt classism or racism, or it can be more subtly based on stereotypes, such as when an employer assumes that someone will be good at math because they have a name that seems Asian.

Subtle effects of our names may compound over time, influencing where we end up, wrote Dubner and Levitt.

To better understand how names are perceived, psychology professor Richard Wiseman of the University of Hertfordshire asked 6,000 Britons to rate the 40 most popular first names for such qualities as intelligence and success. For those traits, "royal names" won out, such as James and Elizabeth.

Wiseman concluded that there may be an element of self-fulling prophecy; if children feel that they are being held to high standards, they may be more likely to go the extra mile.

How Names May Affect Career

A number of researchers have combed through demographic data to discover how trends in naming may impact those in the working world.

Adam Alter, an author and professor of marketing and psychology, found that people tend to prefer politicians with simpler names.

Economists Bentley Coffey and Patrick McLaughlin found in a study that women with names that sound more "masculine" (such as Kerry or Jody) were more likely to be judges than women with names that are considered more typically feminine (Hazel, Laurie, or Ashley).

In a 2000 study, psychologist James Bruning of Ohio University found "that people subconsciously predict career success for those with names that more closely match the gender stereotype associated with a profession," according to a statement from the university.

Bruning added, "I wouldn't overestimate the impact of names, but at the same time, names are an important part of first impressions."

Bruning said employers may make a subconscious connection between a position and what they view as a gender match with an applicant's name. In his study, published in the Journal of Social Psychology, women with more feminine names—Emma, Marta, Irma, and Winifred—were considered more likely to be successful in traditional female occupations, such as nurse, hair stylist, or interior decorator. Men with more masculine names—Howard, Boris, Hank, and Bruno—were assumed to be more successful in traditionally male jobs, such as plumber, truck driver, and electrician.

"A woman named Garret pursuing a job in daycare or a man named Hank contemplating a career as a hair stylist, for example, might be searching for that dream position longer than an Emma planning to be a flight attendant or a Bruno seeking construction work," the researchers concluded.

What's in a First Name?

In 2002, psychologist Brett Pelham, then an analyst for Gallup, wrote a research paper called "Why Susie Sells Seashells by the Seashore," which posited that people often follow professions that resemble their first names. Women named Laura often become lawyers, while men named Dennis often become dentists, he wrote.

Pelham also noted that women named Georgia are more likely to move to the state of Georgia, while men named Louis often end up in Louisiana.

Pelham told Science Focus that the force behind such self-selection is something he called "implicit egotism," which is the tendency to pick things that remind us of ourselves, even the letters in our names.

"If you notice even some fragment of your name, it catches your attention and creates a positive association for you," Pelham said.

When it comes to naming a royal baby, Bruning told National Geographic that the monarch's family is likely to consider issues of history and tradition carefully. When it comes to everyday people, Bruning said, "You may be naming a baby, but what you are really doing is naming an adult, because they will be an adult for 40, 50, or 60 years.

"Put an adult title in front of the name and if it sounds ok, it is probably a good name. President Trixsie? President Catherine is probably much better."

So what is in a prince's name? Do you think your name has helped or hurt you?

Follow Brian Clark Howard on Twitter and Google+.

73 comments
Liz Goddard
Liz Goddard

What about the name Scott? I have had a few in my life that have been really bad news and a few that have been good. They tend to be successful and stubborn. One of the bad news ones is my step-father and the other is my daughter's father/ my ex. My boss is a Scott though and I couldn't be happier with him  as my employer.

Liz Goddard
Liz Goddard

What about the name Scott? I have had a few in my life that have been really bad news and a few that have been good. They tend to be successful and stubborn. One of the bad news ones is my step-father and the other is my daughter's father/ my ex. My boss is a Scott though and I couldn't be happier with him  as my employer.

Zen Galacticore
Zen Galacticore

My real name is 'Sam'. When I was in and out of college, I waited tables to pay the bills. One time, it went like this:

"Hi folks. My name is Sam, what can I get you to drink?"

The host looked up and said, "Sam? With a name like 'Sam' you should be back in the kitchen cooking."

I shot back, "Really, what about 'Sam' Nunn, the Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee?" (At the time, the Georgia senator held that position, for years, and was highly respected by both parties and the American people in general.)

'Samuel' by the way, in original Hebrew is, 'Schmuel', which means, "Peacemaker". And no, I'm not Jewish. I'm Presbyterian! hehe

Zen Galacticore
Zen Galacticore

How about Anthony 'Wiener', exposed for sending pics of his private parts through Facebook. Or John 'Bobbit', the guy who had his private part cut off by his insane girlfriend.

Or, get this, a former Georgia congressman named Pat 'Swindal', who was involved in a political scandal involving, you guessed it, swindling! 

Former Fed chairman in charge of the US money supply, interest rates, etc., Alan "Green"span.  There's been several others of note that I can't think of right now.

But really, what's in a name? A rose by any other name? What about the late Frank Zappa's son, "Moon Unit"?  A girl in my high school was named "Kelly Green", and another was named, "Candy Cane". I kid you not.

Shakira Steele
Shakira Steele

My real name is the Spanish translation of a Crazy Catholic Saint; is it a coincidence, that life drove me crazy with PTSD?

S McGuyre
S McGuyre

The S is for Starley.  A 65-year old man, I have gone by the nickname of Mac all my life and often wonder how things would have turned out if I had a different name. Did my name mold my nature? Would I have been a different person?

Emma Mattson
Emma Mattson

I disliked my name because it was "girly" and I wanted to be taken seriously by guys when I was in elementary school. Then I researched what it meant and when I got older I liked Emma Lauren.

Robyn Alexiadis
Robyn Alexiadis

I hated my name when I was a child and wanted to change it. I lived in a largely Spanish speaking area where people would frequently mistake my name for "Ruben," a completely masculine name. I felt androgynous. To add insult to injury, people, thinking they were being funny, would ask as to the whereabouts of Batman. My mother named me and must have felt guilty about my distress, because when I went to school, she let me go by my middle name, "Linnell." When I changed schools later, I went back to using my first name. It is actually spelled with the traditional masculine "i" which is a common unisex form in the U.S. When I moved to Australia, people spelled my name with a "y" which I find to be much more pleasing, and I don't correct them unless they ask, or unless it's an official document. Also, I have found that most Australian women named Robyn are about 10 to 15 years older than me, making me think it must have been a popular girl's name in the 1950's.

Lindsey Ridgway
Lindsey Ridgway

Lindsey Erin and Sean Parker. My first and middle names and my son's first and middle names. I've never liked my first name but I thought I did well on my son's names.

Cathy O.
Cathy O.

I worked for a CPA and was responsible for payroll taxes. I developed a working relationship with a state official, Mr. Fortune.  He asked if he could call me by my first name and I agreed. I then asked him his first name so I could reciprocate. He replied, "Easy". His first name and his initials  E. Z. were "the same".  I found it somewhat humorous, as did he, that  he worked for the Kansas Unemployment Division. Mr. E. Z. Fortune.

Joan Soldwisch
Joan Soldwisch

Like Martha, I disliked my name, too....but because it seemed 'short'.  Over time I wondered if my Mother was a movie buff as it seemed several 30s and 40s actresses were Joans.  But, it is...what it is....and what's in a name is fascinating.  Peter...any enlightenment?

Martha Schwope
Martha Schwope

I've always disliked my name, as it seems very prissy to me, and I also never liked the part about Martha being the one in the kitchen with the cooking and dirty dishes.  As a lark, I call myself Ruby now and then.  It somehow seems like the opposite of Martha.

Katie Mass
Katie Mass

What about Katie vs. Katherine?  Katie's probably the most common abbreviation for Katherine, but it's always seemed so young to me.  Though I've only ever gone by Katie, I feel like I'm going to have to start using Katherine as an adult/professional.

Jennifer Thurston
Jennifer Thurston

and plz what would Jennifer Dee Thurston be, maybe then I will know what my purpose is?

John Adamson
John Adamson

When I visited America, they told me my name meant the loo!

William Ekornsæter
William Ekornsæter

Espen is a very common scandinavian name, I don't think many scandinavian parents name their child after ESPN.
The ESPN channel is not big in scandinavia at all.

Diane Brewer
Diane Brewer

I love that you actually study this! I have always been fascinated by names and do believe they have an effect on later life. I do anesthesia on labor and delivery and I hear all kinds of names given to newborns (including a set of twins = Luke and Leia).  Sometimes I just cringe at the names given.  And it's fascinating to see the patterns that emerge, currently it's older, classic names becoming more popular (Sophia, Emmett, etc.). Patients have joked about naming their baby after me when I give them pain relief.  Which made me realize, there is no male form of Diane. I've always liked my name and I realize it's an ancient name, which I also like.  I was only named that because we were surprise twins and my sister looked so much like my Dad (Dennis Charles - a lawyer) that they named her Denise, and wanted a D name for me.  She has never liked her name (Denise Michele - a secretary). I was given the traditional Catholic girl's middle name, Diane Marie (nurse anesthetist). Any insight on our names? And do you see any effects twins names have on each other?  How often do you come across female names that aren't derivatives of male names?  Very interesting article!

Emily Mashie
Emily Mashie

To add to your list, can you tell me about the name Emily? I was named after my Italian grandfather, Emil. I once looked up the most common names chosen for people my age - Emily was the number 2 most used name at the time. A lot of me hated that, hated jerking my head around when I heard the name from across the room only to find that the speaker was speaking to another blessed with the name. For years, I went by my oh-so-unique last name because I knew there wouldn't be any confusion. I also hated that the name can mean "envious" or "rival". How unromantic! Ironically though, I love the sound of my name. I think it flows quite well out of the mouth and is laced with a good combination of different sounds.

Marianne Jacobsz Kapp
Marianne Jacobsz Kapp

A fascinating article. What I wonder though is how other factors relating to a name can have an impact on a person. For example, I received the first two names that belonged to great-grandmother, Marianne Caroline Fielding Bramley. As a child my father took me to visit her grave and I've always somehow identified with the other Marianne.

Brittany Poplacean
Brittany Poplacean

I'm a youthful looking (as in short, and I haven't changed physically in 10 years) 28 year old woman and my name is Brittany. In my job I've been stereotyped as a day-dreamer and as someone who needs more time to learn instruction although that's not how I am in reality. At university, my fellow students are 100% of the time shocked to find out that I'm married and a decade older than most of them. It's difficult to see myself in an authoritarian role such as a mother or high-ranking academic or business person. That might be why I've been late in my decision to complete my university education. I want to attend law school and I will likely change my name to take on a more professional moniker. I don't want to be the one to change the stereotype as my physical appearance also sets me back. There is so much in a name! People who've never experience set-backs because of them have a hard time grasping that concept (until this article), but it is very real.

Sharalyn Pliler
Sharalyn Pliler

There is the saying in racing: give a horse a good name and he'll run. 

Tomas Mickevicius
Tomas Mickevicius

Peter, can you tell something about the history ofmy name - Tom?

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

Ha ha, Bob is a Robert, right Bob Wright. Sorry Bob, I enjoy a little light banter, but seriously, the name Robert is a very successful name. Unlike the 'P' that has a tendency to fall forward, the 'R' is more advanced and represents the knowledge on high, and well protected from falling forward. The whole name Robert is a strong and successful business name.

Bob on the other hand, is a lot softer, more sensitive and enjoys a little more romance, but in any way you look at it, Bob likes to be his own boss, to work in autonomous positions or simply lead the field with initiatives for Africa. Cheers Bob, and well, Bob is just... Bob I suppose, unless he's a Robert, then he's rich! (one of the most successful business names there is but John is tops in that field)

To finish, then off to bed, my research has revealed that the name John is the most successful name in business in the Western world, yet James is a more common name over John. John also holds the highest mass murders name too - so they're really good, or really bad. Cheers, Peter Vaughan, New Zealand. 

bob wright
bob wright

I've never met anyone named Phil who wasn't sort of a .... well, Phil. You know what I mean. 

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

Unbeknown to most, the letters of the Alphabet have an origin, and in simple terms, are symbolic of a picture. The letter 'P' as in Paul or Paula is the first impacting sound a person hears of the name whether they hear it, or read it, The "Sound" is the same in the Mind. The Brain assesses every sound subconsciously and relates it to events and similarities that it has amassed over our life times.

The letter 'P' represents a person of wisdom that gains their wisdom from 1st hand experience. The top of the 'P' is a circle of knowledge on a pole - the pole must remain balanced or the 'P' will topple forward and learn the lesson. Hence the letter represents "he or she who gains knowledge through mishap or experience" and all people who have their first name starting with 'P' experience the same knowledge-gathering in their formative years.

'Paul' mean a fast talker, often making things up as they go and have a very active and sharp mind (many tell whoppa's); the name 'Paula' relates to more of a bossy type, someone in charge, one who organises the others under their guide, and, they're not really 'humble or little' by any means.

Names in name dictionaries are mostly hand me down ideas of what names really mean. This has been my life's work and I don't know anyone else out their who does what I do. I'd love to share this with people if they're interested. Regards, Peter Vaughan, New Zealand.  

Paula Seeger
Paula Seeger

For those who might be interested, look up "Hortatory names" as a topic. I believe the Puritans used them, especially with girls.  I like the idea of "earning" your name when you mature, much like how American Indians name their children after some puberty ritual.

FYI: "Paula" is the female "Paul"...meaning humble or little.

Amadeus DeKastle
Amadeus DeKastle

Found this to be an interesting read as people here in Kyrgyzstan are oftem names after animals, plants, places, or traits (not always, but often) and so much is attributed to a name in this Central Asian culture..  Altynbek, Gulmira, Kuban, and Barsbek are a few good ones, meaning man of gold, flower, happy, and snow leopard man respectively.  Anyways, I'm fairly familiar with my own name, Amadeus, but Peter, feel free to enlighten me a bit more about what you see in this name (and any of the above Kyrgyz names as well).

Quinton Deppert
Quinton Deppert

My name Quinton has always been an oddball. I am the only Quinton I know. what could my name mean?

Wanda Holman
Wanda Holman

I am told that I was named after my dad's old girl friend and consequently I have always felt that my name was a whores name.  My mother never called me by Wanda and always called me by my middle name Lynn.  I have no preference for either name and wished I had been named Lydia, Kelly or Stacie.

Seonie Inglis
Seonie Inglis

Fascinating reading Peter Vaughan, thanks for sharing your knowledge! 

How would you describe the name Seonie or Zanita?  Mine and one of my sister's names and two names we've never found in baby name books! 

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

As a names analyst for 33 years, I have realised that the name at birth literally governs the life of the individual, and with 200,000 case studies to support my life's work, the statistics have created the science of name analysis that has taken me away from my professional career as an electrician.

The New Royal addition, Prince George, was as I understand it, wanted to be called Alexander by Princess Catherine, and this factor will cause the child some grief and before the child is a year old, there will be some significant changes in the child's life.

George relates to a name having clever qualities, the ability to speak up, to gather knowledge and become a capable adult...

Alexander comprises a personality in some regards similar to that of the name George, except is makes the child more emotional, less adaptable, more intelligent, needing structure and the freedom to express his ideas and self through a proactive outlet, such as sport, music, the arts etc. However, Alexander is far more intelligent a name than George will ever be, so, if you want a smart King of the future, mother knows best.

Names, and the reasons why they affect us as they do, has been overlooked since Biblical times as can be researched.

Thanks for reading my comments; Peter Vaughan - New Zealand

Joyce Miller
Joyce Miller

I never really liked my name.  It sounded so "adult" when I was young.   People named Joyce on TV or movies always seemed to be bitchy.  Oddly, I like the letters in Joyce -- they look "happy" ;)

tyank twonk
tyank twonk

ah, the U.S.: where we love... monarchs? and their brats?!?

british royalty--- all "royalty"- whether figurehead or otherwise- should be dropped off on Palmwood Dr., LA, CA in full regalia.


Isabel Cervantes
Isabel Cervantes

Hmm, what does 'Isabel' sound like?? I remember growing up I always hated my name, to me it sounded dumb and it didn't really seem to suit my personality, but now-- I guess it does..?? My name is Isabel and I'm an RN student :)

Simone Smith
Simone Smith

Can a Simone make it as a scientist or will I forever be synonymous with existentialist philosophy? Either way I'd be happy.  

Tahne Flaherty
Tahne Flaherty

 My parents thought every new child should have a new name with no preconceived notions. As I get older I love my unique name. It's mine to give. If I don't want someone to know my name I let them mispronounce it. It's like having a secret name that only my friends know how to pronounce. (Ssshh don't tell anyone, it's pronounced like Connie with a T.)  It is a drawback when posting comments on websites, because there is only one of you, so I have to be careful what I say. :)

Brandy Decker
Brandy Decker

While my name is not unusual nowadays, it certainly was whilst growing up in the 70's and 80's. My nicknames were many: any alcoholic drink one could think of; and I answered to them all. My parents had a great sense of humor: my sister's name is Sherry. I have always been proud of my name; it helped me realize my uniqueness and provided me with a sense of self. I do not feel it has ever held me back or caused any distress. (I do admit it was disconcerting when, on the first day of school, one of my elementary school teachers commented her St Bernard's name was Brandy) I worked as both bartender and cocktail waitress in college (Ha Ha) but am now firmly ensconced in a technical field - so I haven't had any issues career-wise. I do find some people form erroneous opinions of those named "Brandy" and thoroughly enjoy watching them as they come to the realization that I'm not some ditzoid. I don't even mind being serenaded with the Looking Glass song. All in all, my name has engendered a good sense of self and healthy sense of humor. Thanks Mom and Dad!

G. Marie
G. Marie

My parents named me ( being born on Christmas Day) when 'Gay' meant happy, and my birth Slavic last name was pronounced gall, or Gaul...but in reality, having a name of Gay Gal meant the first job interview I did had the interviewer falling off his chair in laughter and asking me what my 'real' name was...after I divorced, in self defense I took my middle name as my last name...which in turn creates its own issues as on forms often it is reversed for me by others to Marie Gay, assuming I put my first name in the space for Last Name by mistake. Although heterosexual, I sometimes wished I WAS gay since that would be a funny coincidence!

Zen Galacticore
Zen Galacticore

@Martha Schwope How is it that 'Martha' evokes images of a woman in the kitchen doing dishes? How about George and 'Martha' Washington?

Ottoman Jad
Ottoman Jad

@Jennifer Thurston Thurston is somewhat similar to thrust or thirst.....how about engineering (mehcanical, aerospace) or hydrology..study of water? Think about these interesting careers :-)

Amadeus DeKastle
Amadeus DeKastle

@Peter Vaughan 

Peter,  I'm just curious about your breakdown of the letters and what they mean.  This seems like it might be an easy explanation for those who spell their names using our westernized latin based alphabet, or maybe you have only studied the meanings and influences of names in cultures and languages that use the latin alphabet, but here in Kyrgyzstan, the name Paul is spelled Павел since we use the Cyrillic alphabet.  So can these meanings of a name be transcendent between different alphabets if they are based on the shapes of letters?  If they cannot be, then how can they be a valid indication of what a person's character is like?  What about when the name is spelled in the Coptic, Georgian, Armenian, or Arabic alphabet (where the name Paul is used in each language)?  

Janet Reygan
Janet Reygan

@Wanda Holman  

Hi Wanda,  It's not so hard to change your name; what's stopping you?  If I were you, I'd also change my last name - the letter H is not good.

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Seonie Inglis Seonie is a very sensitive name and it means you seek honesty and security (even trust) with those you allow into your circle of friends. It relates, at a mature level of analysis as being a name that can take charge, assess and organise anything within technical boundaries. When you were 23, you had an emotional event :-)

Zanita is a strong and determined name. It has mental agility and is not a name to be messed about with. This person (sister) can be very determined, speak her mind, is not afraid of people in general but has a great deal of inner strength - and secretiveness - that she conceals fairly well. This is a bright name and she is smart - hopefully not too smart for her own good. haha. Thank you for your comment. Peter

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Joyce Miller Joyce is a rigid name as it is laced with ideas and sensitivity. It is a name that appreciates loyalty, honesty and trust, but is dashed and painful when people hurt their feelings, and the name Joyce has such potential if only people would listen and support their 'bright ideas'.

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Isabel Cervantes The name Isabel relates to a chatty and colourful person. Things happen really fast in your life and there is so much to so and discuss with others. You are really clever with your hands and they will play an important part of your life/career. You like things in place, organised, well thought out, and then you can take time to play, if you act in reverse as per the last sentence, you need to reorganise your life Isabel. Also, your name dictates you had a big change in your life when you were 10 and 11 due to some emotional events and also, depending on your age and maturity development, at ages 31 and 32, you had some rather important life changing experiences due you which altered your direction. From Peter Vaughan 

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Simone Smith Your name Simone relates strongly to wisdom and the acts of thinking and research - as they seem to intrigue you. Your challenge to overcome is your sensitivity (which will be mastered later in your life) and your need to be more decisive. This is not based on your comments you have written, but based on sticking to schedules and not getting caught up in the fun/easy side of life. You have both science and philosophy in your name, but there is more to you than just your first name as I have outlined here. Regards, Peter Vaughan from New Zealand.    

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Tahne Flaherty Tahne, your name calls for "life's" truths. You have an eye for detail and also enjoy having people around you that you can trust. At ages 3 and 24, you had marked changes in your life based on alterations in your home as a child, and as a job or residence change in your 24th year. This is based on the elements and letters that have been included in the make-up of your name. Your name represents in every respect, structure, intelligence cleverness and the arts where you can express yourself in any form that includes sport, music, craft, writing or even martial arts. Regards, Peter Vaughan, New Zealand.

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Brandy Decker Brandy, irrespective of your name being linked with 'spirits', it actually has other meanings. You have a uniqueness about you, you like to work alone, be your own boss/person, yet you have a soft side too. Many times throughout your younger years, you would have entertained too many 'options' in your mind and found it difficult to make decisions. Hopefully, this is a thing of the past. Your name relates to intelligence, bright ideas, initiative, organisation and structure (as long as you have realised the strength that exists in your name). Be proud of your name as you are in every respect "Unique". Regards, Peter Vaughan, New Zealand.   

Peter Vaughan
Peter Vaughan

@Gay Marie Gay, what a lovely excerpt into your interesting life. As I have your full name now, "Gay Marie Gal" (if this is correct), then you are a warm, caring person even though you have a slightly 'bossy' streak in your make-up. You have the ability to run any organisation with an air of strength and even would be an excellent prospect for working in the psychological field as your name is linked with those that have your personality type. You are more clever than you may like to admit, and when you are hurt, really hurt, you hide your feelings all too well; but not from me. So, that's what your name means in a simplified form. Warm regards, Peter Vaughan, New Zealand. (PS what was the big event you had in your life when you were aged 8?)

Seonie Inglis
Seonie Inglis

@Peter Vaughan - Very accurate on both accounts!!

Emotional event when I was 23 was falling pregnant with my beloved son Luke, (and making the foolish decision to marry his father which was emotional but in a negative way).

My sister Zanita is as you describe, spookily so, and here I always thought she was just being the bossy oldest in the family haha!

She and I have often wondered where our names came from, with Mum and Dad merely saying they heard the names, liked them, but didn't know how they were spelt so replaced the L in Leonie with S = Seonie, and added a Z to Anita = Zanita.  

I've been told Seonie is Italian meaning passionate (passione).  Zanita was told her name was a Gypsy Ugoslavian name!!  People often confuse Seonie with Sione especially being a New Zealander, so I get a lot of strange looks and comments like "what's a white chick like you doing with a male Samoan or Tongan name?"!!

Thanks for your response, I will pass the info on to my sister :-)


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    After achieving nuclear fusion at age 14, Taylor, now 19, is working with subatomic particles for solutions to nuclear terrorism and cancer.

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  • How a T. Rex Packs for a Road Trip

    How a T. Rex Packs for a Road Trip

    The nation's most complete Tyrannosaurus rex specimen is taking a 2,000-mile road trip from Montana to its new home in Washington, D.C.

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  • Be the First to Own <i>Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey</i>

    Be the First to Own Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

    The updated companion book to Carl Sagan's Cosmos, featuring a new forward by Neil deGrasse Tyson is now available. Proceeds support our mission programs, which protect species, habitats, and cultures.

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