PHOTOS: Ten U.S. Species Feeling Global Warming's Heat

PHOTOS: Ten U.S. Species Feeling Global Warming's Heat
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The world's largest turtle, the leatherback tips the scales at some 1,100 pounds (500 kilograms), but its young are rather delicate.<br>
Listed as critically endangered by IUCN, the species nests on tropical beaches, where ambient temperatures are critical to reproduction--they determine the sex of offspring. Rising mercury could cause an imbalance between the sexes, or even heat up sands to a point fatal to eggs and embryos.

Warmer waters may actually increase this turtle's global range. But changing ocean chemistry and circulation patterns could also limit the availability of familiar foods.
— Photograph by Brian J. Skerry, National Geographic Stock
 
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