MINI-STONEHENGE PICTURES: Prehistoric Crematorium?

MINI-STONEHENGE PICTURES: Prehistoric Crematorium?
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Archaeologist Andrew Chamberlain of the University of Sheffield uses a laser scanner in September 2009 to document a hole that once held one of Bluestonehenge's monoliths.

In Stone Age Salisbury Plain, Mike Parker Pearson of the Universty of Sheffield believes, the dead would often be celebrated at the nearby village of Durrington Walls, then carried along a short avenue to the River Avon. The procession would continue down the river, then "dock" at the foot of the avenue leading to Stonehenge—stopping, it's now thought, at Bluestonehenge, perhaps for cremation, before continuing to Stonehenge for burial.

Dig co-director Julian Thomas of the University of Manchester said, "We tend to think of monuments as cultural, and a river or a mountain as something that's natural. What's fascinating about the Stonehenge complex is that these different elements are being threaded together.

"By constructing these monuments you're not just adding a cultural veneer on the surface, you're actually reengineering the world."
— Photograph courtesy Adam Stanford/Aerial-Cam
 
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