H.G. WELLS: 9 Predictions That Have, And Haven't, Come True

H.G. WELLS: 10 Predictions That Have--And Haven't--Come True
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Invisibility, described in H.G. Wells's 1897 book The Invisible Man, may move from the domain of fantasy into reality as scientists make new discoveries on how to conceal the human form. Above, a Tokyo University graduate student demonstrates a "disappearing coat" using optical camouflage technology in 2003.

H.G. Wells's take on invisibility worked, however, by changing the human body to make it "no more opaque than water."

In modern science, invisibility research usually involves a rigid, lens-like structure designed to bend light around the object to be hidden, said Jason Valentine, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

"You're not changing the object itself," he said. "The cloak is separate."

More on H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells Predictions Ring True, 143 Years Later
H.G. Wells Birthday Quiz: The Man Behind the Fiction
H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds: Behind the 1938 Radio Show Panic
Are Neighborhood Aliens Listening to Earth Radio?
Honoring H.G. Wells: Crop Circles Go Worldwide Overnight
ON TV: Time Machine, Airing Thursday, September 24
—Photograph by Shizuo Kambayashi/AP
 
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