H.G. WELLS: 9 Predictions That Have, And Haven't, Come True

H.G. WELLS: 10 Predictions That Have--And Haven't--Come True
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In H.G. Wells's 1896 book The Island of Dr. Moreau, a doctor creates man-beasts and other fantastical creatures in an early version of genetic engineering (above, a technician runs tests at a biopharmaceutical company in Bloomsbury, New Jersey, in September 2004).

Dr. Moreau experiments with blood transfusions, surgical transplants, and other techniques to make strange chimeras--activities that would raise ethical issues and controversies today, said the University of California, Irvine's Benford. (Related: "Animal-Human Hybrids Spark Controversy.")

Although today's scientists do manipulate creatures at the genetic level, he added, "we haven't done anything that gives us a spectacular difference, like talking horses."

More on H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells Predictions Ring True, 143 Years Later
H.G. Wells Birthday Quiz: The Man Behind the Fiction
H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds: Behind the 1938 Radio Show Panic
Are Neighborhood Aliens Listening to Earth Radio?
Honoring H.G. Wells: Crop Circles Go Worldwide Overnight
ON TV: Time Machine, Airing Thursday, September 24
—Photograph by Daniel Hulshizer/AP
 
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