H.G. WELLS: 9 Predictions That Have, And Haven't, Come True

H.G. WELLS: 10 Predictions That Have--And Haven't--Come True
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In the 1899 novel When the Sleeper Wakes, H.G. Wells described 300-foot-wide (90-meter-wide) highways that move like giant conveyor belts, complete with seats and refreshment kiosks. Such an invention is a far cry from today's moving walkways, often found in airports (above, a man repairs a Detroit Metropolitan Airport walkway in 2001.)

That's because fast-moving "slideways" are hard to build, requiring parallel strips moving at different speeds so commuters can step from one to another to move quicker, said Benford, of the University of California, Irvine.

In addition, even today's slower-speed escalators and moving walkways easily break down, Benford said.

More on H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells Predictions Ring True, 143 Years Later
H.G. Wells Birthday Quiz: The Man Behind the Fiction
H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds: Behind the 1938 Radio Show Panic
Are Neighborhood Aliens Listening to Earth Radio?
Honoring H.G. Wells: Crop Circles Go Worldwide Overnight
ON TV: Time Machine, Airing Thursday, September 24
—Photograph by Paul Sancya/AP
 
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