H.G. WELLS: 9 Predictions That Have, And Haven't, Come True

H.G. WELLS: 10 Predictions That Have--And Haven't--Come True
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Marine medics Edwin Samson (left) and Charles William don protective suits during a biological warfare training exercise at California's Camp Pendleton in February 2002.

In H.G. Wells's 1898 book The War of the Worlds, Martians are eventually defeated by bacteria--"slain after all man's devices had failed, by the humblest things that God, in his wisdom, has put upon this Earth," Wells wrote.

Many H.G. Wells fans have viewed this as a warning of the horrors of biological warfare--though that might be giving the science fiction luminary a bit too much credit, Oltion, the Oregon writer, said.

"The War of the Worlds wasn't really biological warfare--it was a biological accident."

More on H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells Predictions Ring True, 143 Years Later
H.G. Wells Birthday Quiz: The Man Behind the Fiction
H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds: Behind the 1938 Radio Show Panic
Are Neighborhood Aliens Listening to Earth Radio?
Honoring H.G. Wells: Crop Circles Go Worldwide Overnight
ON TV: Time Machine, Airing Thursday, September 24
—Photograph by Ruaridh Stewart/AP
 
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