H.G. WELLS: 9 Predictions That Have, And Haven't, Come True

H.G. WELLS: 10 Predictions That Have--And Haven't--Come True
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The idea of antigravity technology goes back at least as far as the late 17th century, when Swiss mathematician Nicolas Fatio de Duillier hypothesized that gravity was caused by bodies' absorption of minute particles. That would mean gravity could be blocked by the right type of shielding.

British science fiction pioneer H.G. Wells riffed on that idea with his imaginary antigravity substance cavorite, described in the 1901 work The First Men in the Moon. (Pictured, a still from the 1964 movie The First Men in the Moon, inspired by the book.)

Used as a spaceship shield, the material allowed its inventor, Dr. Cavor, to escape Earth's gravity and journey to the moon.

But the idea of deflecting gravity just won't work according to modern physics, the University of California, Berkeley's Muller said. That's because gravity isn't particles, but "a force that penetrates everything."

More on H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells Predictions Ring True, 143 Years Later
H.G. Wells Birthday Quiz: The Man Behind the Fiction
H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds: Behind the 1938 Radio Show Panic
Are Neighborhood Aliens Listening to Earth Radio?
Honoring H.G. Wells: Crop Circles Go Worldwide Overnight
ON TV: Time Machine, Airing Thursday, September 24
—Photograph via Everett Collection
 
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