GALILEO'S TELESCOPE AT 400: From Spyglasses to Hubble

Beyond Galileo's Telescope
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Not all telescopes rely on light visible to the human eye. The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico for example, is the world's largest single-dish radio telescope. Its 1,000-foot (305-meter) dish, seen above in May 2007, has been collecting radio waves from space objects since 1963.

Radio astronomy allows scientists to see objects and actions that would otherwise be invisible to humans, such as pulsars, black holes, and stars and planets shrouded by dust. (See pictures of what different types of telescopes can see.)
— Photograph by Brennan Linsley/AP
 
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