APOLLO 11 HOAX PHOTOS: 8 Moon-Landing Myths -- Busted

APOLLO 11 HOAX PHOTOS: 8 Moon-Landing Myths -- Busted
<< Previous   2 of 8   Next >>
Neil Armstrong and Apollo 11's Eagle lunar lander are reflected in Buzz Aldrin's visor in one of the most famous images taken during the July 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing.

You can tell Apollo 11 was faked because ... only two astronauts walked on the moon at a time, yet in photographs such as this one where both are visible, there is no sign of a camera. So who took the picture?

The fact of the matter is ... the cameras were mounted to the astronauts' chests, said astronomer Phil Plait, author of the award-winning blog Bad Astronomy and president of the James Randi Educational Foundation.

In the picture above, Plait notes, "you can see [Neil's] arms are sort of at his chest. That's where the camera is. He wasn't holding it up to his visor."

(Also see restored 1960s moon pictures from unmanned orbiters.)
— Apollo 11 photograph courtesy NASA
 
NEWS FEEDS    After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed. After installing a news reader, click on this icon to download National Geographic News's XML/RSS feed.

Get our news delivered directly to your desktop—free.
How to Use XML or RSS




 

50 Drives of a Lifetime

Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. No wires or syncing. Download Stitcher free today.