PHOTOS: Egyptian Queen's Perfume to Be Resurrected

 PHOTOS: Egyptian Queen's Perfume to Be Resurrected
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The favorite scent of Queen Hatshepsut (above, her mummy at Cairo's Egyptian Museum in 2008) may be re-created from dried oil in a 3,500-year-old perfume bottle, researchers said in March 2009.

The power-grabbing queen took the Egyptian throne in 1479 B.C. to keep her stepson, Thutmose III, from becoming pharaoh.

Though her mummy was found more than a century ago, archaeologists didn't identify it as the queen until 2007, by matching a tooth thought to be hers with an empty socket in the mummy's jaw. (See photos of the mummy.)

Throughout her 20-year reign, the gender-bending pharaoh wore both male and female clothing, but was always fond of perfume—a symbol of power in ancient Egypt, Michael Höveler-Müller, curator of Bonn University's Egyptian Museum, said in an email.

Perfume was also considered valuable and was used on special occasions by members of the upper class and high society, Höveler-Müller said.

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—Photograph by Kenneth Garrett
 
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