Surprise Asteroid Buzzed Earth Monday

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Thanks to data from Siding Spring, other observatories, and amateurs, the orbit for 2009 DD24 is "very well determined now," he said.

Astronomers now know that the asteroid is moving within the inner solar system and that the space rock completes an orbit around the sun every 1.56 years.

This means the asteroid could swing close by Earth again someday—though that doesn't seem to be any cause for alarm, if Monday's flyby is any indication.

"As far as we know," Spahr said, "nothing unusual happened."

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