Strong Hurricanes Getting Stronger; Warming Is Blamed

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The stormy hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005—the year of Hurricane Katrina—intensified a continuing debate about whether global warming is affecting hurricane formation.

Some scientists say that the increasing intensity of hurricanes since 1995 is part of a natural storm cycle that waxes and wanes every 25 or 30 years.

MIT's Emanuel, who is well known for supporting the idea that warming is intensifying hurricanes, said the new report is "further evidence for the effect of global warming on hurricane intensity.

"This study offers definitive evidence that there are more of the very strongest hurricanes around the world, even though the total number of storms globally shows hardly any trend."

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