PHOTOS: Stonehenge Was ''Domain of the Dead''

PHOTOS: Stonehenge Was ''Domain of the Dead''
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Three cremated bodies dug up at Stonehenge in the 1950s show that the monument served as a long-term burial ground, archaeologists say in a study released today.

The earliest cremation burial, a pile of burned bones and teeth dating to around 3000 B.C., came from one of 56 pits known as Aubrey Holes (above) that dot the perimeter of the site. It's estimated that up to 240 people are buried at Stonehenge, most of them inside the Aubrey Holes—making it the largest known cemetery of its time in Britain.

Some 50 cremation burials were dug up in the 1920s but they were reburied because they were thought to be of no scientific value.

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