Bear Bile, Tiger Parts Sold in Myanmar Markets

Myanmar's Booming Illegal Wildlife Trade
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Young monkeys, seen here on sale at Mvng La's Central Market in April 2006, are still common fare in many restaurants in Myanmar and especially China, according to wildlife photographer Karl Ammann.

Some of the illegal wildlife circulated through trade networks end up as trophies, but most are used in traditional Asian medicines or served as food in exotic restaurants. Others are sold as captive animals through an international black market network.

In 2005 Southeast Asian countries formed the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network with the goal of stamping out the wildlife trade.

Raids and crackdowns since then have been successful, but illegal trade still flourishes, said Steven Galster, the Bangkok-based director of Wildlife Alliance, which campaigns against illegal wildlife trade.

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—Photograph by Karl Ammann
 
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